Schwarzenegger, McCain back low carbon fuel

TERMINAL ISLAND, California Wed Feb 21, 2007 3:41pm EST

Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) (L) and California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger speak during a news conference about reducing greenhouse gasses at the Port of Los Angeles February 21, 2007. REUTERS/Mark Avery

Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) (L) and California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger speak during a news conference about reducing greenhouse gasses at the Port of Los Angeles February 21, 2007.

Credit: Reuters/Mark Avery

TERMINAL ISLAND, California (Reuters) - California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Arizona Sen. John McCain on Wednesday called for a nationwide roll-out of California's new low carbon fuel standard.

The two did not say how low-carbon fuels would become a U.S. standard, or whether McCain would make it part of his expected 2008 presidential campaign.

Schwarzenegger last month signed an executive order to create what he called the world's first low carbon fuel standard in an effort to reduce carbon intensity in the state's passenger vehicle fuels by 10 percent by 2020.

"All of this is great for our environment, our economy and our taxpayers because the low carbon fuel standard will more than triple the size of our renewable fuels market in California and put more than 7 million alternative fuel or hybrid vehicles on our roads by 2020 without any new government spending," Schwarzenegger said.

Republican McCain was in California touring the Los Angeles port area with Schwarzenegger on Wednesday.

The California standard, Schwarzenegger said, will reduce carbon emissions by 13 million metric tons annually, equal to taking 3 million cars off the road.

Three months ago, McCain announced he was forming a presidential exploratory committee. He failed in his 2000 attempt to gain the Republican nomination.

Schwarzenegger's executive order on carbon reductions was signed in mid-January.

In late January, the European Union announced it was also calling for cuts in carbon emissions by 10 percent by 2020. The EU said this would reduce emissions by 500 million metric tons.

California has also called for a 25-percent cut in climate-changing greenhouse gas emissions by 2020.

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