Quinn gets wish to play for Browns

NEW YORK Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:05pm EDT

University of Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn (R) points to fans after being drafted by the Cleveland Browns as their second pick, in the first round of the 2007 NFL Draft in New York April 28, 2007. The Browns made a trade with the Dallas Cowboys to acquire Quinn who was favored to be drafted earlier in the day. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

University of Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn (R) points to fans after being drafted by the Cleveland Browns as their second pick, in the first round of the 2007 NFL Draft in New York April 28, 2007. The Browns made a trade with the Dallas Cowboys to acquire Quinn who was favored to be drafted earlier in the day.

Credit: Reuters/Brendan McDermid

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NEW YORK (Reuters) - Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn waited anxiously on Saturday with TV cameras aimed at him for four hours before his name was finally called at the draft.

"My stomach was twisting and turning," Quinn told reporters at Radio City Music Hall.

His ordeal had a happy ending when the Ohio native's hometown Cleveland Browns sealed a dramatic trade with the Dallas Cowboys to make him the 22nd pick of the first round.

Quinn, who had been expected to be chosen early, watched as fellow QB JaMarcus Russell was made top pick overall by the Oakland Raiders.

The Ohio native, who threw 37 touchdown passes against seven interceptions last season, watched Detroit take wide receiver Calvin Johnson with the second pick, the fourth time in five years they used a first-round selection on a receiver.

Cleveland then took offensive tackle Joe Thomas from Wisconsin third. The waiting continued but eventually Quinn's phone started ringing.

The Browns gave Dallas their second-round pick, and their first-round choice in 2008.

"To have Cleveland come back up felt like the weight of the world was lifted off my shoulders," said Quinn, who went to his first Browns game aged seven.

Quinn got his wish to join the Browns, with Thomas as a double dose of help for an offense that ranked 31 of 32 teams.

"You've got to be excited about having a guy like that block for you on the blind side," he said about Thomas.

Asked if he looked forward to proving teams wrong that ignored him in the draft, Quinn said: "I'd be lying if I said no.

"It's OK to have a chip on your shoulder. It's all motivation."

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