More Germans want to return to D-mark - poll

FRANKFURT Sun Dec 16, 2007 10:00am EST

FRANKFURT Dec 16 (Reuters) - More than 60 percent of Germans want to reinstate their old Deutsche mark (D-mark) and ditch the euro, the European Union's common currency, an opinion poll showed on Sunday, six years after the euro's launch.

The poll of 1,300 Germans of voting age found 61.6 percent favour the D-mark, up from 54.3 percent in a similar poll three years ago, Dresdner Bank said in a statement.

Pollster Forschungsgruppe Wahlen (FGW) conducted both surveys on behalf of the bank, which is owned by German insurer Allianz (ALVG.DE).

Among women, 71.2 percent would prefer the D-mark, an increase of 12 percentage points in three years.

Three out of four Germans still mentally convert euro prices into D-marks, unchanged from 2004, the FGW poll showed.

Just over one-third, 36.3 percent, of respondents were satisfied with the euro, down from 42.6 percent in 2004. Younger people and those with a higher education were more inclined than others to favour the euro, Dresdner Bank said.

Many Germans associate the euro with higher prices, calling the single currency "Teuro" -- from the German word "teuer", which means expensive.

The political establishment in Berlin is staunchly supportive of the euro and the independence of the European Central Bank, which sets monetary policy for the euro zone.

In the post-war decades preceding the launch of the euro, the D-mark earned a reputation as continental Europe's most stable national currency. (Reporting by Peter Starck, Editing by Erica Billingham)

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