Samsung Opens a Window to the Future of Television Technology at CES 2008

Sun Jan 6, 2008 5:00pm EST

* Reuters is not responsible for the content in this press release.

Next-generation OLED models, ultra-slim 52-inch LCD and quadruple
       full-HD LCD lead array of cutting-edge models on display
LAS VEGAS--(Business Wire)--Strengthening its leadership position as the world's premier
provider of sophisticated, beautifully designed HD televisions,
Samsung Electronics is providing attendees at the 2008 Consumer
Electronics show with a roadmap of where TV technology is headed with
an assortment of bleeding edge products on display.

   The lineup at the Samsung booth will include two (14.1" and 31")
organic light-emitting diode (OLED) TVs in addition to an ultra-slim
52" LCD TV and quadruple full-HD LCD TV. Each reflects Samsung's
proficiency at combining high resolution images with sleek design.

   "OLED and quadruple full-HD technologies represent an entirely new
paradigm in picture resolution technology," said Dr. Jongwoo Park,
president of Digital Media Business, Samsung Electronics. "This is a
level of clarity that is in some cases four times beyond current
industry standards yet retains the slim fits and light weight that
have made our models preferred among consumers."

   OLED is seen as a powerful contender to be at the center of the
future display market mainstream given its very high resolution,
svelte profile and extremely light weight. Electronics manufacturers
have already begun exhibiting these next-generation displays at major
trade shows, but Samsung is going a step further at CES 2008. The OLED
is being presented as a finished TV product that features an elegant,
optimized design.

   The chic, ultra-slim OLED TVs employ AM OLED panels developed by
Samsung SDI, a Samsung affiliate dedicated to display production. The
finished products weigh some 40 percent less than other LCD TVs of the
same size while boasting a contrast ratio of 1 million to one, color
gamut of 107% and brightness of 550nit. Samsung will begin commercial
production of mid- to large-sized OLED TVs around 2010.

   Also on display at the Samsung booth will be a 52" LCD TV that is
slimmer than any other non-OLED TV ever made. It has 50,000:1 contrast
ratio and 550nit brightness. Mass production of this model is
scheduled to begin in 2009, as the company continues to maintain its
leadership in the flat panel TV market.

   Samsung continues to set the pace in the arena of picture quality
with the unveiling of "Quadruple full-high definition" (QFHD), which
refers to a resolution of 3,840 pixels by 2,160 pixels, which is four
times greater than that for a typical high-definition display. Samsung
will unveil the world's largest (82") QFHD LCD TV to date.

   Finally, Samsung is introducing a 57" LCD monitor (model: 570DXN)
that can recognize a user's motions even when the user is a short
distance away from the monitor. The monitor takes advantage of a 3D
motion sensing solution developed by interactive media company
Reactrix Systems. Samsung plans to commercialize this monitor in 2008
and will target it for commercial (B2B) advertising applications.

   About Samsung Electronics

   Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. is a global leader in semiconductor,
telecommunication, digital media and digital convergence technologies
with 2006 consolidated sales of US$86.8 billion and net income of
US$8.5 billion. Employing approximately 150,000 people in 134 offices
in 62 countries, the company consists of five main business units:
Digital Media Business, LCD Business, Semiconductor Business,
Telecommunication Network Business and Digital Appliance Business.
Recognized as one of the fastest growing global brands, Samsung
Electronics is a leading producer of digital TVs, memory chips, mobile
phones and TFT-LCDs. For more information, please visit
www.samsung.com.

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.
Bumjoon Kwak, +82-2-727-7848
b.kwak@samsung.com
or
For Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.
Edelman
Jerry Griffin, 212-704-4536
jerry.griffin@edelman.com

Copyright Business Wire 2008
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