Lou Reed rocks out at bankers' private gig

PARIS Mon Jan 21, 2008 5:59pm EST

Lou Reed performs during the Isle of Wight Festival at Seaclose Park in Newport on the Isle of Wight, June 11, 2006. Reed took a walk on the not-so-wild-side on Monday when he played a private concert for a group of Parisian financiers. REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico

Lou Reed performs during the Isle of Wight Festival at Seaclose Park in Newport on the Isle of Wight, June 11, 2006. Reed took a walk on the not-so-wild-side on Monday when he played a private concert for a group of Parisian financiers.

Credit: Reuters/Alessia Pierdomenico

Related Topics

PARIS (Reuters) - Rock star Lou Reed took a walk on the not-so-wild-side on Monday when he played a private concert for a group of Parisian financiers.

Reed played to an audience of around 500 bankers and business executives at a theatre on the Avenue Montaigne, a street full of haute couture shops off the Champs Elysees.

"I love Paris," said the 65-year old New Yorker, drawing a loud cheer from the mainly middle-aged crowd.

The concert, which was not open to members of the public, was organized by French finance company Carmignac Gestion.

"We offered him some money and he came," said an executive involved in the organization of the event.

Many arrived at the concert fresh from a day in the office grappling with a dramatic slump in European stock markets.

Several bankers could be seen typing into their Blackberries and poring over data before Reed took to the stage.

Reed rose to fame in the late 1960s and early 1970s as a member of avant-garde rock group The Velvet Underground. The band was championed by artist Andy Warhol and also featured European model Nico.

After leaving The Velvet Underground, Reed embarked on his long and successful solo career, which has produced hits such as "Walk On The Wild Side", a song chronicling the hustlers, transvestites and other characters of early 1970s New York.

(Reporting by Sudip Kar-Gupta)

FILED UNDER:
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.