Rambus to seek injunction against Hynix

SAN JOSE, California Thu Mar 27, 2008 3:12pm EDT

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SAN JOSE, California (Reuters) - Memory chip technology designer Rambus Inc (RMBS.O) will seek an injunction to compel Hynix Semiconductor Inc to stop making memory chips that use some of Rambus' technology, according to lawyers present in federal court here.

Rambus' plan follows a decision on Wednesday by a federal court jury in San Jose, California, that the company did not violate antitrust laws or commit fraud in its attempt to protect its patents.

The long-running lawsuit pits Rambus against memory chipmakers Hynix (000660.KS), Micron Technology MU.N and Nanya Technology Corp (2408.TW).

At stake are royalties of at least hundreds of millions of dollars that Rambus could collect from its technology that speeds the performance of memory chips used in a vast array of electronic devices.

Los Altos, California-based Rambus said on Wednesday that that the jury verdict should complete the case involving Hynix.

Hynix, the world's No. 2 memory chip maker, said it was "deeply disappointed" and would appeal if the court ultimately ruled against it.

A spokesman for Taiwan's Nanya said, "We are very disappointed with the court ruling and we're considering an appeal."

Boise, Idaho-based Micron, the largest U.S. memory chipmaker, also said on Wednesday it would appeal, calling Rambus' patents invalid and therefore unenforceable.

Analysts have estimated Rambus could collect royalties ranging from hundreds of millions to billions of dollars over the next decade. It is not yet clear when Rambus might receive any back royalties.

Shares of Rambus were down 6.6 percent, or $1.71, to $24.15 on Thursday after jumping 39 percent on Wednesday following the jury verdict.

(Reporting by Jason Bennert; Writing by Duncan Martell; Editing by Brian Moss and John Wallace)

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