Canadian men and women differ in love: survey

TORONTO Thu May 29, 2008 12:20pm EDT

A couple enjoys the sunny weather while sitting on the edge of the lake of Zurich March 13, 2007. Love is in the air for over 70 percent of Canadians, but men and women seem to view romantic relationships differently, according to a new survey. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

A couple enjoys the sunny weather while sitting on the edge of the lake of Zurich March 13, 2007. Love is in the air for over 70 percent of Canadians, but men and women seem to view romantic relationships differently, according to a new survey.

Credit: Reuters/Christian Hartmann

TORONTO (Reuters Life!) - Love is in the air for over 70 percent of Canadians, but men and women seem to view romantic relationships differently, according to a new survey.

An Ipsos Reid poll that surveyed 1,033 Canadian adults found 78 percent of women said they were in love, while only 64 percent of men said the same.

"It seems that men and women are not quite on the same page," said Sean Simpson, research manager at Ipsos Reid. "There may be some lack of communication going on, or that perhaps men are slower to come around and realize their feelings."

Overall, 71 of those surveyed said they were in love, with more romance in the air on the East Coast than the West. Eighty-nine percent of those from Atlantic Canada said they were in love, while only 67 percent of those in the Pacific Coast province of British Columbia could say the same.

The survey, which Ipsos Reid said was done online by a demographically representative consumer panel, also found that among the 35 to 54 age group, 80 percent of women and 67 percent of men said their partner was "a good lover."

One in 10 said their partner was either "not very good" or "not good at all".

Among those surveyed, 23 percent of men versus 12 percent of women said they were single.

"Online polls tend to be brutally honest," said Simpson, noting that there was no one on the other end of the phone to deal with.

"I wonder if men are fooling themselves, thinking, well there's no one to prove whether I'm single or not."

Ipsos Reid said the margin of error for the poll was plus or minus 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

(Reporting by Solarina Ho; editing by Rob Wilson)

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