Wall Street Journal top U.S. editor resigns: memo

NEW YORK Wed Jun 4, 2008 12:33pm EDT

A copy of the Wall Street Journal is seen at an office in New York, July 31, 2007. One of The Wall Street Journal's top editors is resigning several weeks after parent company News Corp and its chief Rupert Murdoch named one of Murdoch's longtime associates to run the paper. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

A copy of the Wall Street Journal is seen at an office in New York, July 31, 2007. One of The Wall Street Journal's top editors is resigning several weeks after parent company News Corp and its chief Rupert Murdoch named one of Murdoch's longtime associates to run the paper.

Credit: Reuters/Shannon Stapleton

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NEW YORK (Reuters) - One of The Wall Street Journal's top editors is resigning several weeks after parent company News Corp and its chief Rupert Murdoch named one of Murdoch's longtime associates to run the paper.

Bill Grueskin, in charge of the paper's U.S. edition, will leave the influential business daily in a few weeks to become dean of academic affairs at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, according to a memo he wrote to employees on Wednesday that was obtained by Reuters.

The Journal has made "huge strides" in its attempts to adapt to a world of print and online news, he wrote. "Still, the exigencies of updating a site 24/7 and putting out a newspaper six days a week, along with budget, personnel and other duties in this role, have left me little time to focus on broader issues," he wrote.

Last month, Murdoch appointed Robert Thomson as the Journal's top editor, succeeding Marcus Brauchli who resigned under pressure in April. Murdoch is making other changes at the Journal, most notably injecting more general news, political and lifestyle coverage into the paper.

Grueskin's departure is not part of those changes, said Journal spokesman Robert Christie. "Bill has had a long-standing relationship with Columbia, and this is just a natural progression in his career," Christie said.

(Reporting by Robert MacMillan; Editing by Tim Dobbyn)

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