Research and Markets: 'Alcohol Consumption at Home in the United States 2008' Examines...

Wed Sep 17, 2008 11:48am EDT

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Research and Markets: 'Alcohol Consumption at Home in the United States 2008' Examines Socioeconomic Trends as Well as a Number of Other Issues

DUBLIN, Ireland--(Business Wire)--
Research and Markets
(http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/f07e4c/alcohol_consumptio)
has announced the addition of the "Alcohol Consumption at Home in the
United States 2008" report to their offering.

   Recessionary pressures are driving shifts in consumer behavior.
One such shift is the movement toward cooking at home, which has
renewed interest in alcohol as a culinary enhancer rather than just a
mere intoxicator. Moreover, as consumers choose to cut costs and opt
for "staycations", the importance of alcohol in the home is growing
and opportunities abound to repackage and reposition this most widely
used social lubricant.

   In this report, we examine these socioeconomic trends as well as a
number of other issues:

   - How did retail sales grow between 2003 and 2008, and what are
they projected to reach in 2012?

   - What types of alcoholic beverages are selling well, and which
types are less popular?

   - Where do people typically purchase alcoholic beverages?

   - How is the health and wellness trend affecting alcohol
consumption?

   - What type of flavor profiles are likely to remain in high
demand?

   - What factors drive consumer decisions about which alcoholic
beverages to consume?

   - What type of events and occasions tend to drive alcohol
consumption?

   - What segments of the population tend to over-index on alcohol
consumption?

   Key Topics Covered:

   Scope and Themes

   What you need to know

   Definition

   Data sources

   Consumer survey data

   Market size and segmentation data

   Abbreviations and terms

   Abbreviations

   Terms

   Executive Summary

   Still growing--wine still gaining share

   Segmentation of drinkers

   Channel trends

   Market background

   Decision-making drivers

   Occasion-based drivers

   Key demographics

   Premium and super-premium lead Innovation

   Market Size and Spending Patterns

   Key points

   Slowdown in growth rate expected in 2008

   List of Figures

   Figure 1: U.S. retail sales of alcoholic beverages (packaged
liquor, wine and beer), in current prices, 2003-13

   Figure 2: U.S. total U.S. retail sales of alcoholic beverages
(packaged liquor, wine and beer), in inflation-adjusted prices,
2003-13

   Innovative taste profiles, premium products and cocktail culture
drive growth of distilled spirits

   Figure 3: Total U.S. retail sales of distilled spirits (liquor,
brandy and liqueurs), at current prices, 2003-13

   Figure 4: Total U.S. retail sales of distilled spirits (liquor,
brandy and liqueurs), at inflation adjusted prices, 2003-13

   Sales of wine slow, consumers turn attention to beer

   Figure 5: Total U.S. retail sales of wine, in current prices,
2003-13

   Figure 6: Total U.S. retail sales of wine, at inflation adjusted
prices, 2003-13

   Beer sales benefit from innovation, locality and alignment with
"gourmet"

   Figure 7: Total U.S. retail sales of beer and ale, in current
prices, 2003-13

   Figure 8: Total U.S. retail sales of beer and ale, at inflation
adjusted prices, 2003-13

   Household alcohol consumption: high incidence of beer purchase
drives sales increases

   Figure 9: Incidence of household alcohol purchases, by major
category, 2007

   Segmentation

   Key points

   The affluent drive demand for premium and super-premium alcoholic
beverages

   Figure 10: Number of alcoholic beverages consumed per month, by
household income, June 2008

   21-44s over-index on alcohol consumption

   Figure 11: Number of alcoholic beverages consumed, by age, June
2008

   Alcohol consumption fairly constant

   Figure 12: Anticipated use of liquor; drinking more or less than
last year, by age, June 2008

   Liquor beverages are used by 50% or more of drinking age adults
who consume alcohol at home

   Figure 13: Frequency of vodka use, by household income, June 2008

   Figure 14: Frequency of rum use, by household income, June 2008

   Figure 15: Frequency of tequila use, by race/ethnicity, June 2008

   Figure 16: Frequency of prepared cocktail use, by household
income, June 2008

   Figure 17: Frequency of cordial (e.g., brandy and Cognac) use, by
household income, June 2008

   Figure 18: Frequency of gin use, by household income, June 2008

   Wine consumption remains steady

   Figure 19: Anticipated use of wine; drinking more or less than
last year, by age, June 2008

   Figure 20: Frequency of wine use, by household income, June 2008

   Figure 21: Frequency of wine cooler use, by household income, June
2008

   Zinfandel and Merlot are most popular among wine users

   Figure 22: Types of wine consumed, 2007

   About a third of 21-34s anticipate drinking more beer this year

   Figure 23: Anticipated use of beer; drinking more or less than
last year, by age, June 2008

   Figure 24: Frequency of beer use, by household income, June 2008

   Figure 25: Types of beers consumed, 2007

   Channel Analysis

   Key points

   States regulate liquor sales

   Liquor stores and grocery stores are the most frequently used
channels

   Figure 26: Where people buy alcoholic beverages, by household
income, June 2008

   Specialty stores and supermarkets capture the majority of liquor
sales growth

   Figure 27: Total retail sales of distilled spirits (liquor,
brandy, liqueurs) in current prices, by channel, 2002-07

   Figure 28: Total retail sales of wine in current prices, by
channel, 2002-07

   Figure 29: Total retail sales of beer and ale in current prices,
by channel, 2002-07

   Market Drivers

   Key points

   Demographic shifts drive demand for "superfruit" flavors and
imports

   Figure 30: Population, by race and Hispanic origin, 2002-12

   Recessionary pressures drive increased price-sensitivity

   Figure 31: Change in gas prices, all types and regular, 2000-08

   Concern about obesity translates to calorie counting

   Figure 32: Percentage of population who are overweight or
obese--20-74 year olds, 1988-2004

   Health and wellness concerns are driving dietary changes

   Figure 33: Trended attitudes about diet, 2001-07

   Decision-making Drivers

   Key points

   Brand experience, price and convenience are primary
decision-making criteria

   Figure 34: Factors that influence purchasing decisions, by
household income, June 2008

   Figure 35: Factors that influence purchasing decisions, by
household income, June 2008

   Figure 36: Factors that influence purchasing decisions, by
household income, June 2008

   Why people are drinking more or less--in their own words

   Increases driven partly by appeal of food pairings

   Drinking more with friends at home

   Some motivated to drink more by belief that small amounts can
promote good health

   Motivated to drink at home by cost savings and the comforts of
home

   More free time drives increased use

   Stress reduction another commonly cited motivator

   Concerns about weight management and general health can drive down
consumption

   Cost is another driver of decreased usage

   General concerns about drinking too much drive down consumption

   Occasion-based Drivers

   Key points

   Personal milestones, New Year's Eve, summer holidays and Christmas
are important drivers

   Figure 37: Events that motivate the purchase of alcohol, by age,
June 2008

   Figure 38: Situational motivators of at-home drinking, by age,
June 2008

   Attitudes towards Drinking, Its Effects and Drink Marketing

   Key points

   Willingness to experiment begins to decline by the mid-forties

   Figure 39: Attitudes towards experimenting with new alcoholic
drinks, by age, June 2008

   25-34s are somewhat more concerned about side effects and many are
interested in functional beverages

   Figure 40: Health-related drinking attitudes, by age, June 2008

   Figure 41: Alcohol knowledge and interest in learning, by age,
June 2008

   Hispanics drink more and, like blacks, tend to be somewhat more
responsive to marketing efforts

   Figure 42: Attitudes towards branding, packaging and pricing, by
race/Hispanic origin, June 2008

   Innovation and Innovators

   Key points

   Premium flavored liquors meet demand for high-quality "superfruit"
varieties

   Premium spirits meet demand for higher-quality, purer varieties of
liquor

   Inexpensive table wines that pair well with healthy American and
Italian cuisines are among the most practical recent innovations

   Organic varieties respond to growing demand for all things
eco-friendly

   Some manufacturers are responding to the shift in demand for more
ethnic products

   Advertising and Promotion

   Heineken ad suggests broad appeal

   Figure 43: Heineken Christmas, 2007

   Bud Light ads align the brand with masculine camaraderie

   Figure 44: Bud Light - "Dude, that's some serious cheese," 2007

   Figure 45: Bud Light - "Roommates," 2007

   Smirnoff plays on the backyard party theme

   Figure 46: Smirnoff Ice Light, 2007

   Appendix A: Other Useful Consumer Tables

   Figure 54: Frequency of malt beverage use, by household income,
June 2008

   Figure 55: Frequency of Scotch use, by household income, June 2008

   Figure 56: Frequency of Irish Whiskey use, by household income,
June 2008

   Figure 57: Frequency of Canadian Bourbon use, by household income,
June 2008

   Figure 58: Frequency of aperitif use, by household income, June
2008

   Figure 59: Drinking behavior, by age, June 2008

   Cluster analysis demographics and characteristics

   Cluster characteristics

   Figure 60: Attitudes towards branding, packaging and health
aspects, by clusters, June 2008

   Figure 61: Source of alcoholic beverages, by clusters, June 2008

   Figure 62: Beliefs and habits, by clusters, June 2008

   Cluster demographics

   Figure 63: Alcohol at home clusters, by gender, June 2008

   Figure 64: Alcohol at home clusters, by age, June 2008

   Figure 65: Alcohol at home clusters, by household income, June
2008

   Figure 66: Alcohol at home clusters, by race, June 2008

   Figure 67: Alcohol at home clusters, by Hispanic origin, June 2008

   More custom consumer groups

   Figure 68: Custom consumer groups who over-index on beer, June
2008

   Figure 69: Custom consumer groups who over-index on wine, June
2008

   Figure 70: Custom consumer groups who over-index on liquor, June
2008

   Figure 71: Custom consumer groups who over-index on cordials, June
2008

   Figure 72: Custom consumer groups who over-index on gin, June 2008

   Figure 73: Custom consumer groups who over-index on prepared
cocktails, June 2008

   Figure 74: Custom consumer groups who over-index on rum, June 2008

   Figure 75: Custom consumer groups who over-index on tequila, June
2008

   Figure 76: Custom consumer groups who over-index on vodka, June
2008

   Figure 77: Custom consumer groups who over-index on wine coolers,
June 2008

   Appendix B: Trade Associations

   Companies Mentioned:

   - Greenfield Online

   - Heineken USA Inc.

   - Distilled Spirits Council of the United States

   - National Restaurant Association (NRA)

   - Brewers' Association of America (BAA)

   - Anheuser-Busch Companies Inc

   - Costco Wholesale Corporation

   - SAM's Club

   - Wal-Mart Stores (USA)

   - U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

   - InBev

   - Verbatim Americas LLC

   - Whole Foods Market Inc

   - U.S. Department of Agriculture

   - Clipper City Brewing Company, LP

   - Diageo Plc

   - Campari Group

   - American Beverage Licensees

   - Beer Institute (The)

   - National Beer Wholesalers' Association (NBWA)

   - National Association of Beverage Retailers (NABR)

   - Wine and Spirits Wholesalers of America

   For more information visit
http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/f07e4c/alcohol_consumptio

Research and Markets
Laura Wood, Senior Manager
Fax from USA: 646-607-1907
Fax from rest of the world: +353-1-481-1716
press@researchandmarkets.com

Copyright Business Wire 2008
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