FACTBOX-Broad agenda for U.S.-China dialogue

July 26 Sun Jul 26, 2009 8:52am EDT

July 26 (Reuters) - Top U.S. and Chinese officials will hold talks in Washington on Monday and Tuesday on a broad range of economic, security, diplomatic, energy and environmental issues.

Following are some of the major areas to be covered in the Strategic and Economic Dialogue:

ECONOMIC STIMULUS

The United States, the world's richest country, and China, the fastest-growing major economy, are likely to commit to maintaining fiscal and monetary stimulus policies to bolster their recoveries and try to help shore up a weak world economy.

ECONOMIC REBALANCING

The United States, forced by economic crisis to cut consumption and boost savings, will urge China to do the opposite -- consume more and save less -- in order to reduce Chinese current account surpluses. [ID:N23396905]

TRADE AND CURRENCY

The United States, which ran a record $266 billion trade deficit with China in 2008, is seeking ways to rebalance trade, including persuading the Chinese to liberalize exchange rates so that the yuan currency appreciates to trim Chinese exports and boost imports. [ID:nN11262]

CLEAN ENERGY AND CLIMATE CHANGE

The United States and China, the leading emitters of greenhouse gases, want to promote clean energy technology trade and other ways to cooperate in reducing heat-trapping gas emissions blamed for global warming. [ID:nN09459126]

NORTH KOREA AND IRAN

The two U.N. Security Council permanent members will discuss ways to curb the nuclear weapons programs of North Korea, which has tested two nuclear devices since 2006, and the suspected nuclear arms ambitions of Iran. China has close ties with both states.

GLOBAL TROUBLE SPOTS

Conflict-ridden Myanmar, Sudan and Zimbabwe are all countries isolated by international sanctions but states with which China has close economic and political ties and influence.

HUMAN RIGHTS

The United States remains concerned about China's curbs and censorship of the Internet, controls on religious freedom and policies toward Buddhist Tibet, which was racked by unrest in 2008, and Muslim Xinjiang, where ethnic rioting caused the deaths of 156 people this month. (Writing by Paul Eckert in Washington; Editing by Mohammad Zargham)

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