"ObamaVision" deemed top TV word of 2009

LOS ANGELES Wed Sep 23, 2009 3:55pm EDT

Then President-elect Senator Barack Obama (D-IL) is pictured live on a giant screen as he addresses supporters at his election night rally in Chicago, November 4, 2008. REUTERS/Jason Reed

Then President-elect Senator Barack Obama (D-IL) is pictured live on a giant screen as he addresses supporters at his election night rally in Chicago, November 4, 2008.

Credit: Reuters/Jason Reed

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LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - "ObamaVision" -- the term coined by the media to sum up President Barack Obama's pledge to bring hope and change to America -- was on Wednesday deemed the most influential English word from television in 2009.

"ObamaVision" was first heard during last year's U.S. presidential election campaign. It topped "financial meltdown" in the 6th annual list of Top 10 Telewords compiled by U.S. tracking group, the Global Language Monitor.

"Michael Jackson" whose death in June triggered days of wall-to-wall news coverage, and "Susan Boyle" -- the British singer who became an overnight sensation after appearing on a televised talent show -- came third and fourth.

The Texas-based Global Language Monitor uses an algorithm to search printed and electronic media and the Internet for trends in word usage and their impact on culture.

It issues its Top 1O Telewords to coincide with the official start of the U.S. television season in late September.

The 2009 list recognized a website for the first time this year, putting Hulu.com in 5th place. Hulu.com, a joint venture between NBC Universal, Fox Entertainment Group and ABC Inc, was launched in 2008 and streams TV shows over the Internet for free.

The Top 10 Telewords of 2009 are:

1) ObamaVision

2) Financial Meltdown

3) Michael Jackson

4) Susan Boyle

5) Hulu.com

6) Vampires

7) Dar Dour (The Iraqi TV show spoof)

8) Wizards

9) "And that's the way it is," (the signoff of late U.S. news anchor Walter Cronkite)

10) Jiggle

(Reporting by Jill Serjeant; editing by Paul Simao)

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