UPDATE 1-Dutch DSB seeks 100 mln euro state capital-report

Sun Oct 18, 2009 5:05pm EDT

* Seeking total capital injection of 200 mln euros

* Talks with potential U.S. buyer break down

AMSTERDAM Oct 18 (Reuters) - Dutch bank DSB is seeking a state capital injection of 100 million euros as part of a rescue plan also involving the conversion of savings deposits into stock, after talks with a potential U.S. buyer broke down.

A Dutch court appointed administrators last Monday at DSB at the request of the central bank after a run on the bank drained 600 million euros in deposits in just 12 days. DSB's owner and founder, Dirk Scheringa, had since tried unsuccessfully to find a buyer for the business.

In a statement, DSB said on Sunday the company could continue operations if it secured a conversion of a "large amount" of savings deposits and a capital injection from the Dutch state of 100 million euros, news agency ANP reported.

The Finance Ministry was not immediately available for comment.

Jelle Hendrickx, a spokesman for a group representing disgruntled DSB mortgage clients, told Reuters DSB was seeking capital support from the state and looking to raise an extra 100 million euros from converting savings deposits into stocks.

But a spokesman for the court-appointed administrators said he doubted the court would allow the time needed to try and implement such a plan.

"It would take at least a few weeks extra delay and when I read the court verdict, it does not leave room for a delay of that time. The delay has to be very brief and I think a plan B as discussed in the media should take a few weeks extra."

The news of the "plan B" rescue came as DSB financial director Ronald Buwalda said takeover talks with an unnamed potential U.S. buyer had been abandoned.

"The party we were in talks with did not want to meet the conditions set down by the court," Buwalda was quoted saying by ANP.

A Dutch court on Friday had given DSB a deadline of 0700 GMT on Monday to find a buyer or face liquidation.

If DSB does ultimately fail, other Dutch banks will be on the hook to guarantee its deposits. The central bank has said they face a maximum guarantee of 3.25 billion euros, which they would have to pay proportionally, based on their market share for savings accounts. (Reporting by Aaron Gray-Block and Ben Berkowitz; editing by Gunna Dickson)

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