Divorce Filings Have Dropped in the Recession Reveals Survey of Top Matrimonial Lawyers

Wed Oct 28, 2009 10:01am EDT

* Reuters is not responsible for the content in this press release.

Divorce Filings Have Dropped in the Recession Reveals Survey of Top
Matrimonial Lawyers


CHICAGO, Oct. 28 /PRNewswire/ -- The economy appears to be downsizing the
frequency of divorce cases, along with jobs and salaries.  More than half of
the respondents to the latest survey of the American Academy of Matrimonial
Lawyers (AAML) are citing a drop in filings during the current recession.  In
all, 57% of the attorneys have noted fewer divorce filings since the last
quarter of 2008.

"The current economic climate is proving to be far more unforgiving than
estranged couples seeking a divorce," said Gary Nickelson, president of the
AAML.  "Forced to weigh damaged marriages against tight budgets and uncertain
financial outlooks, many spouses seem more willing to try and wait out the
recessionary storm."    

Overall, 57% of AAML members reported a decrease in the number of divorce
filings since the last quarter of 2008, while only 14% noted an increase in
filings during these difficult times. 

About AAML
Founded in 1962, the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML) is
committed to encouraging the study, improving the practice, elevating the
standards, and advancing the cause of matrimonial law, in order to better
protect the welfare of American families.

Comprised of the top 1,600 matrimonial attorneys throughout the nation,
members are recognized experts in the specialized areas of matrimonial law,
including divorce, prenuptial agreements, legal separation, annulment,
custody, property valuation and division, support, and the rights of unmarried
couples.  For more information, please visit www.aaml.org.


SOURCE  American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML)

Brian Downey, bdowney@auletta.com, +1-212-355-0400, or Casey Stickles,
cstickles@auletta.com, +1-212-355-0400, both of R.C. Auletta and Co., LLC, for
AAML
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.