NEWSMAKER-Orange revolutionary and "gas princess" Tymoshenko

Mon Feb 1, 2010 12:21pm EST

Related Topics

* A leader of the Orange revolution after career in gas

* Her passion, ambition win both followers and enemies

* She says she is sole guarantor of democracy in Ukraine

KIEV, Feb 1 (Reuters) - Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, who fights opposition leader Viktor Yanukovich for the presidency on Feb. 7, is a former gas magnate whose ringing rhetoric electrified thousands in the 2004 "Orange Revolution".

The petite 49-year-old says she is the sole guarantor of democracy in the former Soviet republic and has promised to clean up corruption and move closer toward Europe while keeping good ties with Russia, a trading partner and supplier of energy.

Tymoshenko shot on to the world stage with her impassioned speeches in the 2004 mass protests against the sleaze of a post-Soviet establishment in which Yanukovich was painted as a pro-Moscow stooge and chief villain after he won a rigged poll.

In the present campaign, she has used her energy and sharp tongue to ridicule her opponent's poor education and decry the support he enjoys from the industrial tycoons in the east.

"There is a majority of people in the country who are ready to vote for a democratic country without criminality and oligarchy in power," she said after coming second to Yanukovich in a first round of voting on Jan. 17.

"As a presidential candidate I will never allow the country to return to the path that it was on in 2004," she said.

Many economists see her as a populist with an emphasis on strengthening a state safety net, while her policies have been described as ad hoc state interference, such as fixing price controls for petrol and food to keep inflation down.

Her call for a review of thousands of privatised assets that she said were sold to oligarchs on the cheap -- much as in Russia during the 1990s -- spooked investors who wondered whether any business would be secure from the state.

In the end, she succeeded in reselling just one asset -- a steelmill to ArcelorMittal for $5 billion.

She has repeatedly lashed out against corruption in the gas sector and has accused Russia of trying to gain control of Ukraine's gas transit system to use as political leverage.

She herself, however, is reported to have made millions in the 1990s as president of a company that was for a while the main importer of Russian natural gas. That earned her the nickname of the "Gas Princess".

She built better ties with Moscow as the Kremlin increasingly took against President Viktor Yushchenko, whom she helped to power in the "Orange Revolution" but of whom she is now a bitter political foe.

STYLE-CONSCIOUS

Always stylishly dressed with a trademark peasant-style hair braid, Tymoshenko's sharp tongue, combative style and sheer drive bring her either devout followers or deadly enemies.

After the success of the "Orange Revolution", her relationship with Yushchenko soon fell apart -- she was twice his prime minister -- and he devoted as much time to trying to undermine her campaign as he did Yanukovich's.

Billboards appearing this week show her looking sideways with an almost regal air beneath a slogan that says: "Choose a new path for Ukraine".

Born in 1960, in Russian-speaking Dnipropetrovsk in eastern Ukraine, Tymoshenko studied at the local university, married while still a teenage student and had a daughter in 1980.

Taking advantage of an entrepreneural climate in the Soviet Union under leader Mikhail Gorbachev, Tymoshenko's first taste of self-made money came from a video rental store she set up.

She soon crossed into the energy sector and went on to become head of Unified Energy Systems, from which she earned the sobriquet the "Gas Princess".

She entered parliament in 1996 and was made a deputy prime minister in 2000 by the new premier -- Yushchenko.

Both, however, fell victim to political intriguing under President Leonid Kuchma. Yushchenko was sacked as premier, while Tymoshenko spent several weeks in jail on corruption charges. She was cleared of those charges.

On leaving prison, she changed her image from that of a plain, dark-haired woman. Her hair became lighter and she took to wearing the braid and designer outfits increasingly often.

Her stylist later told media the folksy look was designed to distance herself from an association with wealth and to emphasise a national Ukrainian identity.

About 13 years ago, having set her sights on a political career, she began to improve her Ukrainian and now speaks it fluently on the campaign trail even when she is in Russian-speaking regions. (Writing by Sabina Zawadzki; editing by Richard Balmforth)

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Comments (3)
ASceptic wrote:
Looks like the authors of this article have made up their mind but I doubt the people of Ukraine will make the same mistake on the 7th – people are fed up with orage revolutionists.

Feb 01, 2010 12:49pm EST  --  Report as abuse
tener wrote:
I think that, to a large extent, intentions and ideas behind Tymoshenko’s policies have been misunderstood or deliberately misinterpreted. Take a much feared reprivatisation, e.g. People falsely see it as breaching private property rights, whereas the very idea of reprivatisation is fostering property rights on legitimate grounds, not on corruption grounds. It is precisely corruption that necessitates reprivatisation as a remedy and it is precisely an open auction to get best market price for a SOE that Tymoshenko preached as its tool. No one now doubts legitimacy of property rights of ArcelorMittal, who owns steel giant Kryvorizhstal, precisely because it was re-privatised at a public auction with outside bidders. It was the most (and only) transparent privatisation in the history of independent Ukraine, and it’s a pity that Tymoshenko lacks both political powers (but not will) to carry her reprivatisation policy to a logical conclusion. Only that would create wealth of Ukraine as a nation, as opposed to behind-the-curtains privatisation of Kuchma’s time, which filled pockets of a few chosen.

Feb 01, 2010 3:15pm EST  --  Report as abuse
tener wrote:
I think that, to a large extent, intentions and ideas behind Tymoshenko’s policies have been misunderstood or deliberately misinterpreted. Take a much feared reprivatisation, e.g. People falsely see it as breaching private property rights, whereas the very idea of reprivatisation is fostering property rights on legitimate grounds, not on corruption grounds. It is precisely corruption that necessitates reprivatisation as a remedy and it is precisely an open auction to get best market price for a SOE that Tymoshenko preached as its tool. No one now doubts legitimacy of property rights of ArcelorMittal, who owns steel giant Kryvorizhstal, precisely because it was re-privatised at a public auction with outside bidders. It was the most (and only) transparent privatisation in the history of independent Ukraine, and it’s a pity that Tymoshenko lacks both political powers (but not will) to carry her reprivatisation policy to a logical conclusion. Only that would create wealth of Ukraine as a nation, as opposed to behind-the-curtains privatisation of Kuchma’s time, which filled pockets of a few chosen.

Feb 01, 2010 3:16pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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