PRESS DIGEST - Canada - May 13

Thu May 13, 2010 7:29am EDT

May 13 (Reuters) - The following are top stories from selected Canadian newspapers. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

THE GLOBE AND MAIL:

- Former Liberal defence minister Bill Graham is acknowledging an agreement signed under his watch to protect detainees handed to rough Afghan jailers was flawed and should have included better follow-up monitoring for torture.

Graham's appearance before the Commons committee probing the detainee controversy Wednesday marked the first time a high-ranking member of the former Liberal government agreed to talk to MPs about its role in setting up the problem-plagued handover process. - Montreal police regained control of the downtown core early Thursday after firing tear gas at hundreds of bottle-tossing youth, many of whom looted businesses following a stunning playoff victory by the Canadiens.

The vandalism occurred after the area crammed with tens of thousands of jubilant hockey fans had mostly emptied out following the Habs' Game 7 win over the Penguins in Pittsburgh.

BUSINESS SECTION:

- Crescent Point (CPG.TO) is paying C$1.1 billion to snap up Shelter Bay Energy Inc, a deal that will see it bring into its fold more land in Saskatchewan's much-desired Bakken region. The company also announced a bought-deal financing worth C$375 million.

NATIONAL POST: - Quebec Language Minister Christine St-Pierre said on Wednesday she is still working on her bill to answer a Supreme Court of Canada ruling that declared unconstitutional a law to limit transfers to public English-language schools in Quebec.

Under Quebec legislature rules, Wednesday was the last day to give notice of the bill to ensure its adoption before the national assembly recesses on June 12.

FINANCIAL POST: - What could have been an epic showdown at a posh Yorkville hotel Wednesday between independent studio giant Lions Gate Entertainment Corp (LGF.N) and billionaire activist investor Carl Icahn instead became, in Icahn's words, a "waste of money and a non-event."

Icahn didn't make an appearance at the company's shareholder meeting, which lasted a mere 18 minutes and saw 56 of holders in the niche movie studio approve a poison-pill defence plan aimed at stopping the famous corporate raider from mounting a hostile takeover of Lions Gate.

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