Google sets "late fall" release for Chrome

TAIPEI Wed Jun 2, 2010 6:52pm EDT

Google software engineer Ben Goodger introduces the company's web browser, Google Chrome, at the company's headquarters in Mountain View, California September 2, 2008. REUTERS/Kimberly White

Google software engineer Ben Goodger introduces the company's web browser, Google Chrome, at the company's headquarters in Mountain View, California September 2, 2008.

Credit: Reuters/Kimberly White

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TAIPEI (Reuters) - Google expects to release its Chrome computer operating system in the "late fall", a top executive said on Wednesday, as it aims a competitive strike at rival Microsoft's Windows.

The Chrome system will designed initially to work on laptop PCs, Sundar Pichai, Google's head of the Chrome project told reporters at the Computex PC show.

"We will be selective on how we come to market because we want to deliver a great user experience," he said. "We're thinking on both the hardware and software levels."

Google is seeking to challenge the dominance of Microsoft's Windows operating system, which currently runs on more than 90 percent of all personal computers currently.

Microsoft on Thursday waved off Google's efforts to develop an open source operating system, saying that software developers would have to create different versions of the same application for different brands.

Pichai disputed that contention, saying the similarity in the base core would mean software companies would not have to develop a new version for Chrome.

"Chrome OS is one of the few future operating systems for which there are already millions of applications that work," Pichai said. "You don't need to redesign Gmail for it to work on Chrome. Facebook does not need to write a new app for Chrome."

Open source software allows tech companies such as Acer to develop their own versions of the software using the skeleton provided by Google to fit their own needs, and its presentation may differ between brands.

The Chrome operating system will be centred around the web browser, with all software including high-end applications such as those used in photo and video editing housed in external servers known as a cloud.

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Comments (8)
kkhatri wrote:
Shouldn’t the first line read as “The Chrome system will initially ‘be designed’ to work on laptop PCs, Sundar Pichai, Google’s head of the Chrome project told reporters at the Computex PC show”?

I believe, that’s a typo?

Jun 02, 2010 7:43am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Kinetic wrote:
@STORYBURNcom10

I doubt that will be the case. Microsoft invests a lot more in cloud computing than Google does.

There will probably some Google fans who will switch to the ChromeOS, but I’m pretty sure that “taking a huge share” is far from what will happen.

Compare, for instance, Microsoft Office and Google Docs. It was the exact same enthusiasm back then: cloud computing, collaborative editing, simplicity rocks, etc. Years after, I think it’s obvious that Google Docs, although a successful product, is far from what fans expected.

Jun 02, 2010 10:08am EDT  --  Report as abuse
robsku wrote:
@Kinetic
Word, in fact I believe that cloud computing has been in past, is and will be in future at least ten times more hype than what’s really happening – though I will admit that in future cloud computing may actually come seriously viable type of software/implementation.

What is left out in articles that hype clouds is the cons, ie. much higher system requirements with less functionality, whole load of new security/privacy issues, etc. and I don’t think that clouds have, in most areas of software, enough pros to offer to justify the cons when the traditional system just works – and lighter than cloud equivalent at that…

Thus I find it unbelievable how often I bump into comment saying that traditional OS’s & software will cease to exist and everything will be ran in a cloud ;)

Jun 02, 2010 11:01pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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