Calderon demands probe of U.S. border deaths

MEXICO CITY Thu Jun 10, 2010 7:14pm EDT

Jesus Librado Hernandez mourns for his son Sergio in Ciudad Juarez June 9, 2010. REUTERS/Alejandro Bringas

Jesus Librado Hernandez mourns for his son Sergio in Ciudad Juarez June 9, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Alejandro Bringas

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MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexican President Felipe Calderon demanded Thursday a thorough investigation of the recent killings of two Mexicans by U.S. border agents that have fanned tensions in Mexico over border policing.

Calderon's statement followed an expression of concern by the foreign ministry over the fatal shooting by U.S. border patrol guards this week of a teen-ager a few steps into Mexican territory at the Ciudad Juarez border crossing.

"The Mexican government is shocked and outraged by the killings of two nationals by the U.S. border patrol," Calderon said in a statement. "We are concerned by the surge of violence against Mexicans along with other recent anti-immigrant and anti-Mexican demonstrations in the United States."

Tensions over U.S. treatment of illegal foreign migrants on its soil, most of whom are Mexicans seeking menial jobs, flared recently when the border state of Arizona passed a harsh law requiring local police officers to detain people they suspect are in the country illegally.

Last month a Mexican man was beaten by U.S. border agents and shocked with a taser gun during his arrest at the border crossing between Tijuana and San Diego. He died from his injuries a few days later.

While Mexico has pushed for years for a bilateral migration accord that could improve migrant rights, the United States has opted for beefing up border controls and policing.

Calderon, stuck in a brutal drug war that has prompted many Mexicans to flee northern cities and towns and seek refuge over the U.S. border, demanded an unbiased and objective probe into both killings and said guilty parties should be punished.

Mexican Interior Minister Fernando Gomez Mont recently discussed the killings in a phone call with U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano and called for a review of security protocols at the border, the Interior Ministry said in a statement Thursday.

An estimated 10.8 million illegal immigrants live in the United States, most of them from Mexico and Central America, and tens of thousands try each year to sneak over the border.

(Editing by Catherine Bremer and Eric Walsh)

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Comments (7)
johnhuetteman wrote:
Although I appreciate the fact that stories need to be condensed for space issues, etc., in this particular case I don’t think it gives full justice to the events that led up to the demise of the individuals discussed in this article, nor does it adequately portray the basis for which immigrants flock across US borders daily in the multi-billion dollar industry of “remesas,” or the wire-transfer of money back home, one of the reasons none of the countries from which emanate illegal immigration into the United States have done much on their side to keep their nationals home.

Additionally, this article portrays border patrol agents as arbitrary killers, rather than people that suffer from rock-throwing and attacks that batter their physical persons where they are in real danger while on the job. I, personally, find this quite insulting and find Mexico’s demand should be met with an equal demand, to know what exactly has Mexico done to prevent its nationals from crossing the border in terms of economic stimulus and creation of jobs. Failure to show any reasonable steps will only concur that their government actually encourages illegal immigration to the United States as they conveniently wait for their nationals to send dollars home.

So, who is the real victim here? That’s what I thought!

Jun 10, 2010 7:55pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
creasybear27 wrote:
The freaking mexican government makes booklet of how to sneak in to America and how to get social services and other government programs,they want money sent back to mexico form here-it’s 1/3 of the GDP and mexicans just they they can just come here and make themselves at home but don’t dare sneak into mexico-prison you will go.The mexican president needs to shut his big mouth and his country is a sewer and it’s spilling over here,it’s more than 11 million illegal aliens,more like 30 million illegal aliens,there not immigrants there aliens and they comehere and drain this country’s resources,costing America billions of billions of dollars every year,plus all the crap they bring with them,gangs,violance,killings,kidnapping,breaking our laws all the time,we need 30,000 troops along the border with orders to shoot and start rounding up illegal aliens and deporting them,taking jobs from Americans,lower our standard of living-there destroying this country-America is the vitim from all these illegal aliens and breaking Americas bank-it’s time for our government to get serious about this,enough is enough.Stop all money we give mexico,finish fench and put troops on border.

Jun 10, 2010 9:29pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
LSinesII wrote:
We should demand that Ol’ Presidente Calderon do something to stop his fellow Mexicans from wanting to cross into the U.S. illegally and then ask him to offer a bit of respect to the U.S. If you do not come to the U.S. the legal way, you should expect to pay the price for being illegal. Is that too hard to understand? Do I need to speak Spanish to make it clear? If you can’t come correct, stay the hell home!

Jun 10, 2010 11:29pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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