General McChrystal to retire from U.S. Army: official

WASHINGTON Mon Jun 28, 2010 9:26pm EDT

1 of 2. General Stanley McChrystal listens to a question from a reporters in the briefing room of the White House in Washington May 10, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - General Stanley McChrystal, who President Barack Obama fired last week as the top U.S. and NATO commander in Afghanistan, has informed the U.S. Army he plans to retire, an official said on Monday.

McChrystal, 55, had been widely expected to retire after he and his aides enraged the White House by disparaging the president and other top civilian advisers in an article for Rolling Stone magazine. He was fired on Wednesday.

Obama said McChrystal's dismissal was needed to safeguard the unity of the war effort.

"McChrystal informed the Army today that he intends to retire," an Army spokesman said.

McChrystal has yet to submit formal paperwork so it is unclear when his retirement will take effect, he added.

Obama has tapped General David Petraeus, McChrystal's boss and the architect of the Iraq war turnaround, to take over the troubled Afghan command. A Senate hearing on Petraeus's nomination is scheduled for Tuesday.

Aides have described the president as furious about McChrystal's contemptuous remarks in the article, entitled "The Runaway General."

In the piece, McChrystal himself made belittling remarks about Vice President Joe Biden and the U.S. special envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan, Richard Holbrooke.

His aides were quoted as calling national security adviser Jim Jones a "clown" and saying Obama seemed intimidated and disengaged at an early meeting with McChrystal.

McChrystal graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1976 and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army, where he rose through the ranks over the next 34 years.

(Reporting by Adam Entous; editing by Todd Eastham)

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Comments (28)
Jawedan wrote:
President Obama is right to fire General Mc Chrystal, because military has to obey the orders of civil goverment n can not openly criticize govt policy. This is the beauty of true democracy and indepentent states can do that. USA is rightly to be the super power of the world.

Jun 28, 2010 9:55pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
ApostasyUSA wrote:
God bless America.

This phrase is used correctly when it conjures an image of God helping people cope with the great losses they have incurred, when it pulls members of the nation together to help and serve one another, and when it asks for the healing of our brokenness that only God can offer. This phrase is used incorrectly when it implies that God should bless our nation at the expense of others, that the United States should enjoy special privilege in the sight of God, or that the lives of Americans are inherently more valuable than the lives of any other people in the world.

Jun 28, 2010 9:55pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
submachine wrote:
This man has served his country and served it well, and you draft dodging bozos have no right to put him down.

Jun 28, 2010 10:02pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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