Google's Android leads U.S. smartphones

SAN FRANCISCO Wed Aug 4, 2010 3:41pm EDT

A T-Mobile G1 Google phone running Android is shown photographed in Encinitas, California January 20, 2010. REUTERS/Mike Blake

A T-Mobile G1 Google phone running Android is shown photographed in Encinitas, California January 20, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Mike Blake

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SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Smartphones running Google's (GOOG.O) Android software were the top seller among consumers in the United States in the second quarter, industry tracker NPD said on Wednesday.

Android accounted for one-third of all smartphones purchased in the April-June period, with Research in Motion's RIM.TO BlackBerry sliding to second place for the first time since 2007.

BlackBerry lost nine percentage points of market share, falling to 28 percent. On Tuesday, RIM unveiled a new touchscreen device as the company tries to reinvigorate its image with consumers.

Apple Inc's (AAPL.O) iPhone was in third place with a 22 percent share.

Android is available on smartphones from a number of different manufacturers.

NPD said Motorola's MOT.N Droid was the best-selling Android handset in the second quarter among U.S. consumers, followed by HTC's (2498.TW) Droid Incredible and EVO 4G.

Google said recently that 160,000 Android phones were activated each day during the second quarter, up from 65,000 in the first quarter.

Smartphone unit prices averaged $143 in the April-June quarter, down 9 percent from a year ago.

(Reporting by Gabriel Madway; editing by John Wallace)

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Comments (5)
Stupidscript wrote:
Apple fanbois, you may begin your statements of how sales numbers don’t make up the whole picture, and how the iPhone 4 is the real leader in smartphones. Bless you.

Aug 04, 2010 3:48pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
testDS001 wrote:
The more players in the market the better it will be for the consumer. I say let the race continue.

Aug 04, 2010 5:03pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Jones22 wrote:
I am always amazed at how stocks rise seemingly on almost no news and decline for reasons that have absolutely nothing to do with that stock.

Google, for example rose over $16 today and closed at around $506. Of course, Android in gaining ground because it is an operating system. It in “not” a cell phone.

It is simply “software” that Google acquired from a small start-up company in Palo Alto, home of Stanford University.

The software adds very little to Google’s revenue. Android is a PR tool for Google, and very little more.

Take a look at Google’s last quarterly revenue statements. Google is a search engine company that earns the vast majority of it’s income by gauging businesses with it’s paid search.

Google is having a great deal of trouble in China right now and every time Google puts out a press release stating that it’s license has been renewed in China, the stock rises. For the record, the license has “not” been renewed in China and Google is currently trying to side-step China by using Hong Kong as it’s base of operations by trying to divert Google Chinese users to the Hong Kong site.

China, has taken acception to this and has starting blocking certain parts of the Hong Kong Google site as well.

We’ll see how this plays out, but I am still amazed at how people don’t even bother to check to see if a Company CEO is misleading the public before they rush out and gooble up the stock. Google is not a cell phone company. Google is a search engine company that is struggling to expand it’s business model… unsuccessfully, I might add.

Aug 04, 2010 5:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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