Consumer agency contender Warren visits White House

WASHINGTON Fri Aug 13, 2010 3:04pm EDT

Congressional Oversight Panel Chair Elizabeth Warren questions Assistant Treasury Secretary for Financial Stability Herbert Allison on the government's assistance to Citigroup during a hearing in Washington March 4, 2010. REUTERS/Richard Clement

Congressional Oversight Panel Chair Elizabeth Warren questions Assistant Treasury Secretary for Financial Stability Herbert Allison on the government's assistance to Citigroup during a hearing in Washington March 4, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Richard Clement

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Consumer advocate Elizabeth Warren discussed the new U.S. consumer agency at the White House but no announcement is imminent about who will lead the agency, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said on Friday.

Gibbs said Warren was at the White House on Thursday. She spoke with staff members including Obama's senior adviser David Axelrod.

"She was here to talk about the office yesterday," said Gibbs.

He made clear no announcement was expected soon, as Obama prepares for travels the rest of this month.

"I do not expect any personnel announcements about this job in the coming week," Gibbs said.

Warren, who has long been an outspoken advocate for consumers, is among a handful of candidates Obama is considering to become the powerful first chief of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was created under the sweeping financial reform bill signed into law last month.

Many on Wall Street fiercely oppose her candidacy, but many liberals in Obama's Democratic Party passionately support her. Whoever is chosen must gain Senate confirmation.

(Reporting by Steve Holland; editing by Mohammad Zargham)

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Comments (1)
cynicalme wrote:
Oh great — another bureau and that means more bureaucracy! More grossly overpaid, under-productive government that does nothing but drag this country to its knees with its overhead. You want consumer protection? Pass laws governing transactions, and get on with it. We do NOT need another bureaucracy!!! This administration just doesnt get it!!!

Aug 13, 2010 9:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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