Fiorina catches up in California money race

WASHINGTON Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:56pm EDT

Carly Fiorina, former Hewlett-Packard CEO and Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, leaves a polling station in Los Altos Hills, California June 8, 2010, with her husband Frank after casting her ballot in the California primary election. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

Carly Fiorina, former Hewlett-Packard CEO and Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, leaves a polling station in Los Altos Hills, California June 8, 2010, with her husband Frank after casting her ballot in the California primary election.

Credit: Reuters/Robert Galbraith

Related Topics

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - After trailing Democratic rival Sen. Barbara Boxer for months in fund-raising and spending, California Republican Senate hopeful Carly Fiorina is closing the money gap, both parties said on Tuesday.

A Washington-based Republican Party affiliate, the National Republican Senatorial Committee, said it was sponsoring a $3 million TV ad campaign in support of Fiorina in the campaign's final week.

The money would pay for an attack ad characterizing Boxer as "self serving" and "ineffective" ahead of Tuesday's midterm elections, the group said.

Democrat-leaning California is one of 10 states the Republicans must pick up to win control of the Senate. The Republicans are seen likely winning control of the House of Representatives.

Earlier this month, Fiorina, the former chief executive officer of computer giant Hewlett-Packard, bolstered her own campaign treasury with loans of $1.25 million in personal funds.

As election day approaches, most polls have showed Boxer leading Fiorina by five or more percentage points, though some recent surveys suggest the race may be tightening.

A Boxer campaign aide acknowledged that Fiorina has been catching up in the money race in recent weeks and that she expects to be outspent in the final days.

Federal Election Commission data show that as of the end of September, Fiorina's campaign had $1.8 million cash on hand and an outstanding debt of $543,000, compared to $6.5 million cash on hand and no debt reported by Boxer's campaign.

Fiorina was admitted to a hospital on Tuesday for treatment of an infection related to reconstructive surgery this summer after breast cancer, but she was expected to make a quick recovery and return to the campaign trail in California.

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (4)
PrincipeReale wrote:
Why hasn’t Fiorina talked about when Boxer was chairperson of Senate Committee hearings about the Countrywide mortgage investigation. Boxer had several Countrywide loans? Boxer should have and did not recuse herself from involvement in these hearings. How can you chair a committee investigating a company that you owe money to? Oh, I forgot, she’s had 28 years of experience in D.C.

Oct 26, 2010 4:39pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
RayGunsmess wrote:
Why hasn’t Fiorina talked about when Boxer was chairperson of Senate Committee hearings about the Countrywide mortgage investigation. Boxer had several Countrywide loans? Boxer should have and did not recuse herself from involvement in these hearings. How can you chair a committee investigating a company that you owe money to? Oh, I forgot, she’s had 28 years of experience in D.C.
———————
Maybe because she is dumb and ineffective just like she was when she ruined HP and laid off over 30,000 high paid highly skilled California workers.

Oct 26, 2010 5:40pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Nerau wrote:
Countrywide Mortgage investigation? Talk about not seeing the forest for the trees – LOL. Why not focus on the fact that Fiorina’s idea of progress is outsourcing American jobs and contributing further to the decline and contraction of the American Middle Class.

Oct 26, 2010 11:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.