Social networking leads to sex faster: survey

NEW YORK Mon Jan 24, 2011 3:44pm EST

A competitor types a text message into a mobile phone during a competition in Singapore November 12, 2006. REUTERS/Vivek Prakash

A competitor types a text message into a mobile phone during a competition in Singapore November 12, 2006.

Credit: Reuters/Vivek Prakash

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NEW YORK (Reuters) - Nearly four out of five women and three of five men say they believe texting, Facebook and other social media tools for staying connected cause new couples to jump into bed faster, a survey released on Monday found.

However, only 38 percent of women say they have actually slept with a date any sooner because of digital intimacy, according to the 1,200 women and men who participated in the third annual sex survey by Shape and Men's Fitness magazines.

Smart phones and laptops are the new toys that lead to the bedroom, it said, with nearly 80 percent of women and 58 percent of men saying social media tools leads to sex faster.

Texting is the No. 1 way lovers stay in touch, the survey found, with men texting 39 percent more often than phoning and women 150 percent more.

Even before the magic begins, 70 percent of women and 63 percent of men use Google and other online tools to screen potential dates.

A full 65 percent of those polled said they had been asked out by text and 49 percent through a Facebook message.

Once the relationship clicks, 72 percent of women report scouring a current partner's ex-girlfriends' Facebook pages.

Even in the heat of passion, some people just can't get enough of their digital devices, the survey found.

When a call or text comes in during sex, a full 5 percent of respondents said they glance to see who is calling and 1 percent say they stop to answer the phone.

And when the spark is extinguished, digital dumping is the new way to break up, with 43 percent of women and 27 percent of men reporting getting a text along the lines of "It's not you, it's me."

For the heartbroken, the Internet keeps hope alive, with 81 percent of all respondents saying they won't de-friend an ex on Facebook and 75 percent admitting to constantly checking a former sweetheart's page.

(Reporting by Barbara Goldberg; Editing by Jerry Norton)

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