Egypt protesters set fire to government building in Suez

ISMAILIA, Egypt Wed Jan 26, 2011 2:44pm EST

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ISMAILIA, Egypt (Reuters) - Protesters in Suez set a government building on fire and tried to burn down a local office of Egypt's ruling party late on Wednesday, security sources and witnesses said.

Protesters threw petrol bombs at the National Democratic Party office but failed to set it alight. Police fired teargas to push the demonstrators back, they said.

Officials in the city in Egypt's northeast ordered that shops be closed after incidents of looting were reported. Clashes with police left some 55 people injured, according to Reuters witnesses.

(Reporting by Yusri Mohamed; editing by Alastair Macdonald)

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Comments (1)
KHStaudt wrote:
I have come to expect better editing from Reuters. The headline for this story does not agree with actual facts of the story. The headline reads that protesters set fire to a government building, but the facts of the story state that the building failed to catch fire. I don’t mean to nit-pick, but as a freelance writer myself, I am under constant scrutiny to edit my work before submission. I expect for Professional journalist to be just that: “Professional.” That includes fact checking and editing your work for content and accuracy before publishing it for the masses. Just because the platform is “Digital Media” does not mean that the old standards of Professional Print Journalism should not apply. Thanks for listening. :)

Jan 26, 2011 3:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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