Judge approves moving Arizona shooting case to Tucson

PHOENIX Mon Jan 31, 2011 3:04pm EST

An artist's depiction shows Jared Lee Loughner (L), the Arizona man accused of shooting 20 people while trying to assassinate U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords over the weekend, and his attorney public defender Judy Clarke during a court appearance in Phoenix, Arizona January 10, 2011. REUTERS/Joan Andrew

An artist's depiction shows Jared Lee Loughner (L), the Arizona man accused of shooting 20 people while trying to assassinate U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords over the weekend, and his attorney public defender Judy Clarke during a court appearance in Phoenix, Arizona January 10, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Joan Andrew

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PHOENIX (Reuters) A federal judge has approved moving court proceedings to Tucson, Arizona from Phoenix for Jared Lee Loughner, the 22-year-old college dropout accused in a shooting rampage there, court filings said on Monday.

U.S. District Court Judge Larry Burns signed off on the agreement between prosecutors and defense attorneys to move the case to the same city where the shootings occurred on January 8, court papers said.

Burns wrote that the order "does not affect the defendant's right to move for a change of venue in the future."

Loughner has pleaded not guilty to federal charges of attempting to assassinate U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords and attempted murder of her two staff members.

Authorities allege that Loughner went to a grocery store where Giffords was conducting a community event and opened fire, killing six people and wounding 13 others.

Among those killed was U.S. District Judge John Roll.

Giffords was shot through the head, but survived, and is undergoing rehabilitation in Houston, Texas.

Burns took over the case when all federal judges in Arizona recused themselves because one of the shooting victims was their colleague, Judge Roll. Burns normally works out of the southern district of California.

Loughner could face up to life in prison if convicted of trying to kill the lawmaker. The other two attempted murder charges carry a maximum sentence of 20 years.

(Editing by Dan Whitcomb and Greg McCune)

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Comments (3)
cgallaway wrote:
That’s a curious change of venue…I wonder if the defense attorney is attempting to taint the jury pool against Mr. Loughner in order to declare a mistrial…or then change to a different venue…thereby wasting a lot more time.

Jan 31, 2011 3:23pm EST  --  Report as abuse
giveitthought wrote:
It’ll be hard to come up with a group of folks who don’t have notions about what happened. Even if you didn’t have the TV on, we all got wind of it pretty quickly out here. Of course, why it’s even getting tried is beyond most of us. Hang him, or shoot him, or hang him and then shoot him, but this one’s not going to be very difficult to try. We can’t even imagine what defense they could possibly have.

Jan 31, 2011 3:36pm EST  --  Report as abuse
DrJJJJ wrote:
No need for further court time-plenty of eye witnesses! Take the money we’d spend litigating nonsense and give it to the victims families and call it justice! This isn’t a case of insanity it’s an indication of the moral crisis in the US!

Jan 31, 2011 5:45pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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