Russian spy Chapman registers her name as trademark

MOSCOW Tue Feb 1, 2011 12:36pm EST

Former Russian spy Anna Chapman is seen after a meeting of the commission on economic modernization and technological development of the Russian economy, at the Skolkovo Innovation Centre outside Moscow December 14, 2010. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin

Former Russian spy Anna Chapman is seen after a meeting of the commission on economic modernization and technological development of the Russian economy, at the Skolkovo Innovation Centre outside Moscow December 14, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Sergei Karpukhin

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian spy Anna Chapman has registered her name as a trademark to cash in on her growing popularity since she was deported in a Cold War-style swap last year, Russia's state patent agency told Reuters on Tuesday.

"Maybe she wants to open the 'Anna Chapman' dry-cleaner or make cookies," Nikolai Kravtsov, an official at the agency, told Reuters by telephone, adding that she had registered for the trademark in August.

The 28-year-old redhead has posed in lingerie, attended a space launch and even had a sing-along with Prime Minister Vladimir Putin since she returned to Russia following her arrest and expulsion from the United States in July.

Chapman, nicknamed Agent "90-60-90" by the Russian press, referring to her alleged measurements, asked to register her name as a trademark for eight lines of merchandise, including vodka, clothing and watches, popular daily Komsomolskaya Pravda reported, saying the trademark would last until 2020.

Chapman's ex-husband may dispute the legality of the trademark, the paper added. Her British citizenship -- which she gained from her marriage to Alex Chapman -- was revoked after the spy scandal.

Her little-known maiden name, Kushchenko, is in her Russian passport, the paper added.

Chapman has boosted her image lately. She has attended a political youth rally and two weeks ago launched a weekly television show called "Mysteries of the World with Anna Chapman."

She was deported with nine other Russian sleeper agents in Cold War fashion in exchange with the United States for a ring of foreign agents working in Russia.

(Writing by Ludmila Danilova, editing by Paul Casciato)

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