Radioactivity increases in sea-water off Japan nuclear plant

TOKYO Sat Mar 26, 2011 10:45pm EDT

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TOKYO (Reuters) - Radioactive iodine in sea-water off Japan's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant rose to 1,850 times the usual level from 1,250 times measured on Saturday, Japan's nuclear safety agency said on Sunday.

Separately, senior agency official Hidehiko Nishiyama said leakage from reactor vessels was likely to have been the cause for high levels of radiation found in water that has accumulated in turbine buildings.

The radioactive water within the plant has hampered workers from restoring its cooling systems.

(Writing by Shinichi Saoshiro)

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Comments (2)
DrJeff wrote:
Although tremendous damage has been done, further damage to lifeforms and the Earth, was averted through visionary application of new technology. The use of this technology in a peacetime effort for constructive purposes, is a demonstration of the values and guidance that is unfolding. It is time to stop the killing and to discuss in a rational manner in open forum, the true needs of humanity and the available resources to meet them. Let us not exercise the ‘default’ options. We must govern on behalf of the seventh generation, which is a ‘mantra’ of the Hopi elders. That makes things clearer.

Mar 26, 2011 11:07pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
fmvssguy wrote:
Detection of iodine-131 should have been the clue of a reactor breach a long time ago, as iodine-131 would not normally be given off by spent fuel rods, only (normally) active fuel rods within the reactor vessel(s). It has a half life of 8 days, now being detected in the U.S. and in China. Couldn’t they detect iodine-131 on-site and come to some conclusion a long time ago instead of “stone walling” the situation with beaurocratic BS?

Mar 26, 2011 11:41pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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