Cameroon Ministry of Finance Selects IBM Mainframe System

Thu Mar 31, 2011 2:00pm EDT

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Cameroon Ministry of Finance Selects IBM Mainframe System

Transforms Payroll Processes for Civil Servants

PR Newswire

YAOUNDE, Cameroon, March 31, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Cameroon Ministry of Finance has turned to IBM (NYSE: IBM) and CFAO Technologies, an IBM Business Partner in West Africa, to help modernize the payroll processes for government employees in the country. The new system, based on IBM mainframe and storage technologies, will help to increase the security of the Ministry's payroll system and improve the efficiency of processes such as generating pay slips. It will provide the Ministry of Cameroon with a 200% increase in performance while reducing operating costs by 30%.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20090416/IBMLOGO)

The news follows last month's announcement that the Customs Directorate of the Senegal Ministry of Finance has selected an IBM mainframe system to transform Senegal's import and export processes.

Cameroon's Ministry of Finance will also use the new z10 Business Class mainframe to run its messaging applications based on IBM Lotus Notes and Lotus Domino software. By running business analytics applications, the Ministry will also have a clearer view of payroll processes to support better decision making.

"The modernization of Cameroon's central IT systems is an important part of the national agenda of the country," said Laurent Onguene, Director of the Cameroon National Center for IT Development at the Ministry of Finance. "IBM mainframe is a proven technology that provides the levels of reliability, security and performance needed for government systems."

The Cameroon and Senegal governments join a growing number of organizations and companies in growth markets that are deploying IBM mainframes, such as the First National Bank of Namibia, Comepay in Russia, Kazakh Rail, HeiTech Padu in Malaysia, China Internet Network Information Center, Korea's BC Card and Korea's Dongbu Insurance.

"As companies and governments across Africa and other growth markets invest in advanced technologies to transform their national infrastructures, the mainframe is coming into its own," said Taiwo Otiti, Country General Manager, IBM West Africa. "Not only does the mainframe provide a secure and powerful IT platform, but it also helps companies and organizations respond to rapid growth in mobile computing and pave the way for smart computing systems."

By implementing the Linux open source operating system, the Cameroon Ministry of Finance will also increase connectivity between different government departments and make it easier to hire and train engineers to operate and maintain the new system.

"For the Cameroon Ministry of Finance it was important to implement a platform based on open source software," said Bernard Beyokol, General Director of CFAO Technologies in Cameroon. "IBM System z running on Linux provides the Ministry with an open platform to help standardize the use of ICT and increase levels of connectivity between government departments."

Under the terms of the agreement, IBM will also provide the Ministry with IBM Total Storage and tape drive. The deal was signed with the Cameroon National Center for IT Development (CENADI), the body responsible for transforming the IT systems of the Cameroon government.  The new system is expected to be operational by the end of April.

About IBM

IBM is celebrating 100 years of technology and business leadership. To find out more about the development of the first mainframe and 100 other iconic moments please visit:

http://www.ibm.com/ibm100/us/en/icons/mainframe/

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About CFAO Group

For more information about CFAO Group please visit: http://www.cfaogroup.com

Contact(s) information

Jonathan Batty
IBM Growth Markets Unit
+48 69393 5403
Jonathan.Batty@pl.ibm.com

Rick Bause
IBM Media Relations
845-892-5463
rbause@us.ibm.com

SOURCE IBM Corporation

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