"Real Housewives" of Washington D.C. get the axe

LOS ANGELES Fri Apr 8, 2011 7:32pm EDT

Kelly Bensimon (L) and Ramona Singer, two of the stars of the new reality television series ''The Real Housewives of New York City'', cheer during the Washington Wizards NBA basketball game with the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in New York January 24, 2011. REUTERS/Ray Stubblebine

Kelly Bensimon (L) and Ramona Singer, two of the stars of the new reality television series ''The Real Housewives of New York City'', cheer during the Washington Wizards NBA basketball game with the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in New York January 24, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Ray Stubblebine

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The "Real Housewives" of Washington D.C. can go back to their day jobs.

Bravo on Friday said there would be no second season of the series set in the U.S. capital -- marking the first time the cable channel has axed one of the series of the popular reality TV franchise.

"The Real Housewives of D.C." made its debut in August last year, giving a new political edge to a franchise better known for picturing rich women who measure their status by money and mansions rather than proximity to the corridors of power.

The show also featured the notorious White House gate-crasher Michaele Salahi -- a socialite who made headlines when she gained entry to a White House state dinner in 2009 without an official invitation.

"We had an amazing season and we told stories that were unique to any other in the franchise. I wish all our D.C. Wives the best and hope to work with them again in another capacity," Bravo executive vice president Andy Cohen told the Washington Post's TV Column.

"The Real Housewives of D.C" did modestly in the TV ratings but was outshone last year by the cat-fighting and sheer opulence of "The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills", which was shot during the divorce of former "Frasier" actor Kelsey Grammer and his cast member wife, Camille.

The "Real Housewives" franchise was launched in Orange County, California in 2006 as a cross between the fictional TV show "Desperate Housewives" and the pampered but trouble teems of "The O.C.".

It now has versions featuring women in New York, New Jersey, Atlanta and Miami, as well as Orange County and Beverly Hills.

(Reporting by Jill Serjeant, editing by Christine Kearney)