Russia arrests man who ate human liver with potatoes

MOSCOW Tue May 17, 2011 12:34pm EDT

Related Topics

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian police said on Tuesday they had detained a man who was caught eating an acquaintance's liver.

Police tracked down the suspect after a trail of severed body parts including limbs and a head were found across Moscow.

"When the police came to arrest the suspect, he was eating a human liver with potatoes," a police spokeswoman for the Moscow's western district said by telephone.

The rest of the human liver was found in a refrigerator in the suspect's flat. The police spokeswoman said the cause of the acquaintance's death was not clear.

The suspect "admitted his crime and that he had eaten part of his acquaintance's liver," the prosecutor general's main investigative unit said in a statement.

(Reporting by Tatiana Ustinova and Guy Faulconbridge; Editing by Peter Graff)

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (4)
WRL wrote:
Potatoes? What’s so heinous about eating potatoes?

May 17, 2011 2:07pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Fatesrider wrote:
Ah, I see why he was arrested (obviously by the food police). One doesn’t eat liver with potatoes. One eats liver with onions. And if one does have potatoes with their liver and onions, they have to be mashed with gravy.

I believe two counts of bad culinary practices merits an arrest rather than just a ticket and tongue lashing.

May 17, 2011 3:40pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
bobw111 wrote:
What, no fava beans?!?

May 17, 2011 3:57pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.