Lockheed says thwarted "tenacious" cyber attack

WASHINGTON Sat May 28, 2011 10:50pm EDT

The F-35 Lightning II, also known as the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF), planes arrive at Edwards Air Force Base in California in this May 2010 file photo. REUTERS/Tom Reynolds/Lockheed Martin Corp/Handout

The F-35 Lightning II, also known as the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF), planes arrive at Edwards Air Force Base in California in this May 2010 file photo.

Credit: Reuters/Tom Reynolds/Lockheed Martin Corp/Handout

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Lockheed Martin Corp, the U.S. government's top information technology provider, said on Saturday that it detected and thwarted "a significant and tenacious attack" on its information systems network one week ago.

"As a result of the swift and deliberate actions taken to protect the network and increase IT security, our systems remain secure," Jennifer Whitlow, a Lockheed spokeswoman, said in an e-mailed statement. "No customer, program or employee personal data has been compromised."

Lockheed's information security personnel are working around the clock to restore employee access to the "information systems network" targeted in the May 21 attack, the statement said.

Bethesda, Maryland-based Lockheed, the Pentagon's No. 1 supplier by sales and the world's largest aerospace company, has kept the "appropriate U.S. government agencies" informed of its actions, it added.

(Reporting by Jim Wolf, editing by Will Dunham)

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Comments (2)
Sure, as if they are going to admit having lost any data in the attack.

May 28, 2011 11:03pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
IntoTheTardis wrote:
China. They aren’t original thinkers, so they have to steal from us.

May 29, 2011 10:25am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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