"Unabomber" journals sell for $40,000 in auction

LOS ANGELES Thu Jun 2, 2011 7:58pm EDT

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LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - "Unabomber" Ted Kaczynski's personal journals sold for over $40,000 on Thursday in an online auction of his personal belongings, authorities said.

The journals fetched the highest bid of any item so far at the auction, which also included his hoodie and sunglasses, along with a typewriter he used to pound out a manifesto against industrialism.

The federal government held the auction of dozens of items, which began on May 18, to raise funds for Kaczynski's victims and their families.

Kaczynski, who claimed to be motivated by a love of nature and hatred of technology, became one of America's most notorious criminals when he was arrested in the killing of three people and wounding 29 with homemade bombs sent by post from 1978 to 1995.

He was captured in 1996, living in a remote Montana cabin.

Kaczynski's typewriter, which he used to write a manifesto he sent to the New York Times and the Washington Post in 1995, sold for $22,000, said Lynzey Donahue, spokeswoman for the U.S. Marshals Service.

The hoodie and sunglasses, which resemble those worn in a widely circulated sketch of the Unabomber suspect, sold as a set for $20,025, Donahue said. His handwritten autobiography went for $17,780, she said.

Terry Turchie, a former official with the FBI, and former FBI special agent Kathleen Puckett, who were involved in the hunt for Kaczynski, released a joint statement last month about the auction.

They said the sale strips Kaczynski of everything "he ever owned or wrote, ensuring that he will never profit from the terrible tragedies he brought to innocent lives."

The 69-year-old Kaczynski is serving a life sentence at a federal prison in Colorado. A former mathematics professor, he withdrew from society in the early 1970s and became a modern day Luddite, with radical anti-technology views.

U.S. agents seized the Unabomber's property when they raided his cabin.

Kaczynski mounted a failed attempt in court to block the auction, and in a 2007 letter to Reuters he said that his papers should instead be made available to researchers and libraries to keep his beliefs in circulation.

As of late Thursday afternoon, bids were still being received on less than 10 of the Unabomber items as the auction drew to a close, Donahue said.

(Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis: Editing by Dan Whitcomb and Greg McCune)

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