Roddick not panicking despite Murray thrashing

LONDON Sat Jun 11, 2011 1:46pm EDT

Andy Roddick returns the ball to Andy Murray of Britain during their semi-final tennis match at the Queen's Club Championships in west London June 11, 2011. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett

Andy Roddick returns the ball to Andy Murray of Britain during their semi-final tennis match at the Queen's Club Championships in west London June 11, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Suzanne Plunkett

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LONDON (Reuters) - Andy Roddick was not reaching for the panic button Saturday despite being thrashed inside an hour by Andy Murray in the semi-finals at Queen's Club.

The 28-year-old all-action American relishes the brief grass court season in which he has reached three Wimbledon finals and claimed four Queen's titles during his career but against Murray he was reduced to the role of spectator.

Even with more than 80 percent of his first serves finding the target, a statistic that would normally spell trouble for an opponent, he walked off a 6-3 6-1 loser, his pride dented after a Murray masterclass.

Former world number one Roddick is nothing if not resilient, though, and despite the thrashing he will arrive at Wimbledon next week as one of a smallish group of players capable of surviving until deep into the second week.

"I think it's about fine tuning more than re-inventing the wheel next week," Roddick, who beat Murray in the 2009 Wimbledon semi-finals, told reporters.

"I think he did a lot right today. I don't think I did a whole lot wrong.

"I felt like I hit the ball well. My serve, I haven't seen it, but I had to be close to 70 percent. I remember missing one second serve return. I felt like I missed a bunch of chips and stuff by an inch or two.

"It certainly does nothing to my confidence level going into Wimbledon. I just thought he played too good today."

Roddick elected to miss the French Open on his least favored surface because of a shoulder injury after consecutive first round defeats on clay in Madrid and Rome.

After a couple of months without a win, the world number 10 said it was a good feeling to arrive at his favorite part of the year feeling fit and healthy.

"I felt really good when I got here, but after having not, you know, played well for two months or so, getting that to translate wasn't always an easy thing," he said.

"I thought I played well. Got four matches, which is really important, and I feel prepared going into the practice week for Wimbledon, so it was a good week for me."

(Reporting by Martyn Herman; Editing by Brian Homewood)

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Comments (1)
bobbynorwich1 wrote:
Good riddance.

Jun 11, 2011 4:51pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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