Sega says 1.3 million users affected by cyber attack

TOKYO Sun Jun 19, 2011 6:28am EDT

A Sega Corp signboard is seen behind traffic signs at the Akihabara electronic store district in Tokyo June 19, 2011. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

A Sega Corp signboard is seen behind traffic signs at the Akihabara electronic store district in Tokyo June 19, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japanese video game developer Sega Corp said on Sunday that information belonging to 1.3 million customers has been stolen from its database, the latest in a rash of global cyber attacks against video game companies.

Names, birth dates, e-mail addresses and encrypted passwords of users of Sega Pass online network members had been compromised, Sega said in a statement, though payment data such as credit card numbers was safe. Sega Pass had been shut down.

"We are deeply sorry for causing trouble to our customers. We want to work on strengthening security," said Yoko Nagasawa, a Sega spokeswoman, adding it is unclear when the firm would restart Sega Pass.

The attack against Sega, a division of Sega Sammy Holdings that makes game software such as Sonic the Hedgehog as well as slot machines, follows other recent significant breaches including Citigroup, which said over 360,000 accounts were hit in May, and the International Monetary Fund.

The drama surrounding the recent round of video game breaches paled compared to what PlayStation maker Sony Corp experienced following two high-profile attacks that surfaced in April.

Those breaches led to the theft of account data for more than 100 million customers, making it the largest ever hacking of data outside the financial services industry.

Sega Europe, a division of Sega that runs the Sega Pass network, immediately notified Sega and the network customers after it found out about the breach on Thursday, Nagasawa said.

Lulz Security, a group of hackers that has launched cyber attacks against other video game companies including Nintendo, has unexpectedly offered to track down and punish the hackers who broke into Sega's database.

(Reporting by Yoko Kubota; Editing by Nick Macfie)

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Comments (14)
Larry2012 wrote:
And yet all those cyberheads will continue to allow their personal information out there in space for all to hack. They will continue to think cloud computing is really cool and texting through so called “social networks” is more fun than having actual, physical friends. I know it won’t do much good, but our personal information is up for grabs by anyone who wants to take the trouble to “mine” it because the lure of a technology that is getting out of hand and is less secure every day. It’s up to all of us to use a bit of common sense before falling for the the “gotta follow like a sheep” mentality.

Jun 19, 2011 6:21am EDT  --  Report as abuse
derdutchman wrote:
Lulz Security, a group of hackers that has launched cyber attacks against other video game companies including Nintendo, has unexpectedly offered to track down and punish the hackers who broke into Sega’s database.
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Wouldn’t you think cyber thieves would have higher code of honor? Isn’t this like a cockroach carrying a flashlight?

Jun 19, 2011 7:04am EDT  --  Report as abuse
moneywon wrote:
This is like banks with no vaults and guards getting robbed weekly but refusing to spend a penny on vaults and guards, just increasing efforts to lure more customers in. Amazingly, people keep lining up to put all their cash in bags and sympathizing with the bank. The government promises to protect the banks from international thieves, but doesn’t deliver.

And in the end the bank could have built a good vault, hired a guard, and everyone could sleep at night.

Maybe this is false flag operations, maybe it’s internation hackers, maybe it’s bored teens, or Chinese pirates or aliens. It doesn’t matter. The point is THE COMPANIES THAT ARE TAKING YOUR INFO AREN’T PROTECTING IT, and they don’t want you to think about that, or worse they are complicit in allowing it to be compromised.

Jun 19, 2011 9:21am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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