British teen hacker suspect granted bail

LONDON Tue Jun 28, 2011 4:29am EDT

1 of 2. Ryan Cleary, who was arrested last week as part of a joint investigation between London police and the U.S. FBI into recent attacks on high-profile websites, leaves after being freed on bail at Southwark Crown Court in London, June 27, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Luke MacGregor

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LONDON (Reuters) - A British teenager accused of attempting to hack the website of a national law enforcement agency and two music industry bodies was released on bail on Monday on the condition he does not try to access the internet.

Ryan Cleary, 19, is charged with attacking the website of the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) and sites owned by the British Phonographic Industry and the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry.

Cleary, who was arrested last week as part of a joint investigation by London police and the U.S. FBI into recent attacks on high-profile websites, was given bail after an unsuccessful appeal by prosecutors at London's Southwark Crown Court.

He must observe a curfew between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m., has been electronically tagged and can only leave home with one of his parents. He is not allowed to access the internet or possess any devices capable of going online, the Press Association reported.

His mother Rita said she would agree to any bail conditions placed on the teenager, who has been diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome since his arrest.

"I'm aware that I'm his best friend as well as his mother, because he's reclusive," she told the court.

The attack on SOCA was one of a number of recent incidents claimed by the Lulz Security (LulzSec) group of hackers, which says it has also targeted the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and Sony Corp.

The group announced on Saturday it was disbanding, saying it had accomplished its mission to disrupt corporate and government bodies for entertainment.

(Reporting by Michael Holden; Editing by Michael Roddy)

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Comments (1)
AnthonyInVA wrote:
I just hope this kid gets a fair trial and is not ‘made an example of.’

Jun 28, 2011 10:39am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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