Beck complains of hostile treatment at New York movie

NEW YORK Wed Jun 29, 2011 8:03pm EDT

TV commentator Glenn Beck addresses the crowd as he stands on the steps in front of the Lincoln Memorial to address supporters at his Restoring Honor rally on the National Mall in Washington, August 28, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

TV commentator Glenn Beck addresses the crowd as he stands on the steps in front of the Lincoln Memorial to address supporters at his Restoring Honor rally on the National Mall in Washington, August 28, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

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NEW YORK (Reuters) - Glenn Beck, the conservative television and radio host, has taken to his Web site and radio show to complain of a "hostile" reception he and his family met from New Yorkers when they attended an outdoor film screening at a park in midtown Manhattan.

Beck told radio listeners that one person at the Bryant Park movie screening of Hitchcock's "The 39 Steps" on Monday evening shouted at him and his family: "We hate conservatives."

Another spilled a cup of wine on his wife, Tania, which Beck said he believes was a deliberate act of malice.

"As we got up to leave the movie, the crowd broke out in applause that we were finally leaving," he told listeners on his syndicated radio show on Tuesday.

Beck discussed the events again on Wednesday, disputing an account published on the Web site of New York magazine by Lindsey Piscitell, who said she was sat near Beck and that while people in the crowd were not "thrilled" to find Beck among their number, his family was left alone and, "for the most part," so was Beck.

Piscitell accused Beck's bodyguards of scolding members of the crowd and said it was her friend who spilled the wine on Beck's wife. But she said it was an accident, albeit "a happy one, to be sure."

On Wednesday Beck suggested on his radio show and Web site that he had found evidence on Piscitell's Twitter account that the wine spill was, in fact, premeditated.

But he said he forgave the jeering New Yorkers, and said he had nothing but love for them, if not for their behavior.

But not all New Yorkers appreciated the gesture: in a poll on the New York Daily News Web site, 71 percent of respondents said they did not feel bad for Beck, and that "he did this to himself."

(Reporting by Jonathan Allen; editing by Chris Michaud and Peter Bohan)

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