Former Harvard president goes off on Winklevoss twins

Wed Jul 20, 2011 7:35pm EDT

Cameron Winklevoss (L) and twin brother Tyler Winklevoss are shown in this combination photo leaving the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals after a hearing on a settlement dispute with Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg in San Francisco, California January 11, 2011. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

Cameron Winklevoss (L) and twin brother Tyler Winklevoss are shown in this combination photo leaving the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals after a hearing on a settlement dispute with Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg in San Francisco, California January 11, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Stephen Lam

(Note: Strong language used in quote, paragraphs 2 and 3)

By Tim Kenneally

LOS ANGELES (TheWrap) - Apparently, Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss really did double the displeasure for Larry Summers.

The former Harvard president reaffirmed the perception created by the 2010 film "The Social Network" during an interview at Fortune's Brainstorm Tech conference, characterizing the button-down siblings as a pair of "a**holes."

"Rarely, have I encountered such swagger, and I tried to respond in kind," Summers recalled. "One of the things you learn as a college president is that if an undergraduate is wearing a tie and jacket on Thursday afternoon at three o'clock, there are two possibilities. One is that they're looking for a job and have an interview; the other is that they are an a**hole. This was the latter case."

In the movie, Summers (played by Douglas Urbanski) is portrayed as dismissing the Winklevoss twins (played by Armie Hammer and Josh Pence) after they attempt to enlist his aid in muscling in on Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook action.

The real-life drama surrounding Zuckerberg and the Winklevosses has involved numerous legal actions, with the twins claiming Zuckerberg had stolen the idea for Facebook from them, and Facebook countersuing, claiming that the pair -- who had launched their own social-networking site, ConnectU -- had hacked Facebook in order to steal information and spam the site's community.

A settlement reached in 2008, which gave the Winklevosses and their partner, fellow Harvard student Divya Narendra, $65 million in cash and Facebook stock, has failed to quell the animosity.

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