Anonymous says hacked U.S. government cyber supplier

WASHINGTON Fri Jul 29, 2011 5:24pm EDT

WikiLeaks supporters wear masks of the ''Anonymous'' internet activist group and a mask of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R) during a demonstration calling for the release of Assange, in Malaga, southern Spain December 11, 2010. REUTERS/Jon Nazca

WikiLeaks supporters wear masks of the ''Anonymous'' internet activist group and a mask of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (R) during a demonstration calling for the release of Assange, in Malaga, southern Spain December 11, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Jon Nazca

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Hackers with the loose-knit group Anonymous said on Friday they had broken into the network of U.S. government contractor Mantech International Corp and posted some NATO-related correspondence online.

Anonymous, tweeting as AnonymousIRC, offered the correspondence between Mantech and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization as proof of the breach. Two involve NATO contracting offices, and one discusses deploying staffers to an unnamed "NATO Theater of Operations" for what appears to be tech services.

Mantech, which claims the U.S. Defense, State and Justice Departments among its clients, declined to comment. It offers cyber security among its services.

Hackers associated with Lulz Security and Anonymous have claimed responsibility for cyber attacks on the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, the U.S. Senate, Sony Corp websites and the website of Murdoch's British newspaper group, News International, among others.

Authorities made some arrests in connection with the breaches, including a teenager detained at a house in the remote Shetland Islands, off Scotland's northeast coast.

There have also been other arrests in Britain and in the United States.

The group has urged supporters to boycott eBay Inc's PayPal electronic payment service, or to close existing accounts. It has previously attacked PayPal to show opposition to the service's refusal to process payments to WikiLeaks, the website founded by Julian Assange that published copies of secret U.S. government diplomatic cables.

(Reporting by Diane Bartz; Editing by Gary Hill)

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Comments (3)
djconklin wrote:
That couldn’t have happened if they had been using a completely secure network that was separate from the web.

Jul 30, 2011 5:52pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
rmkraussr wrote:
this kind of stuff scares me . . . . for what it’s
worth, I am going to stop doing business on the web.
I also fear wiretapping, a most detestable practice, engaged in by the government. I might become a hermit.

r m kraus/akron

Jul 30, 2011 10:03pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
docsls wrote:
Isn’t it ironic that just when Washington is working so hard to find an excuse, any excuse, to shut the internet down for us common folk, that a hacker shows up playing “Robin Hood”? Our government is working overtime and this is just one more example of how far they are willing to go. Anomysous Hacker, who pays your salary? Or do they just pay you under the table in cash?

Aug 01, 2011 12:49pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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