Raise taxes on super rich, not semi-rich: poll

WASHINGTON Tue Oct 4, 2011 11:00am EDT

A man holds his envelopes as he waits in line to mail his family's income tax returns at a mobile post office near the Internal Revenue Service building in downtown Washington, April 15, 2010. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

A man holds his envelopes as he waits in line to mail his family's income tax returns at a mobile post office near the Internal Revenue Service building in downtown Washington, April 15, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Less than a quarter of wealthy Americans support raising taxes on households making $250,000 or more a year, the level being targeted by President Barack Obama, though tax increases further up the income scale have broader support, said a poll released on Tuesday.

Nearly half of those polled approved of income tax increases on discretionary household incomes of $500,000 or more annually, said the poll sponsored by two marketing and publishing companies.

For those earning $1 million or more annually, 65 percent of respondents said they would support income tax increases.

Only 23 percent of respondents said they support tax increases for households making $250,000 a year.

The poll was conducted in September by the Harrison Group, a research and marketing firm, and American Express Publishing Corp., a media subsidiary of American Express Co. It surveyed 769 respondents with minimum discretionary income of $100,000.

Only 43 percent said tax increases would improve the overall economy, while confidence in the economy dropped from 50 percent in September 2010 to 33 percent this year.

The poll found 55 percent of those surveyed do not blame the Obama administration for economic woes.

Obama has called for tax cuts to expire for households earning $250,000 a year. The president is also looking to pass a new levy that would tax Americans earning $1 million or more a year to ensure they do not pay taxes in a lower bracket.

(Reporting by Patrick Temple-West, editing by Kevin Drawbaugh and Gerald E. McCormick)

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Comments (9)
Missourimule wrote:
Just silly — wouldn’t raise enough money to fund the government for an hour and a half — it’s just envy, retaliation.

How ’bout this? We JUST raise the taxes on Warren Buffett?

Oct 04, 2011 11:37am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Ciao wrote:
No, No, I meant you should raise taxes on everyone else, not me! It’s only a good idea as long as long as it’s someone else paying!

Oct 04, 2011 12:32pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Nullcorp wrote:
Health care for all? Free university tuition? Adequate coverage for fire and police? Bridges and roads in good condition? Functional public transit? Funding for meaningful and important scientific and environmental research? These things are paid for with tax money. Take the military out of distant lands, kill the offshore tax breaks for corporations, and get the wealthy to pay their fair share so that the next generation will also have opportunities to create wealth.

Oct 04, 2011 1:16pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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