Iran rejects U.S. allegations of Saudi envoy plot

TEHRAN Tue Oct 11, 2011 5:39pm EDT

Then Saudi Arabian Foreign Policy Advisor Adel-Al-Jubeir gestures during a news conference in response to U.S. engineer Paul Marshal Johnson's beheading at the Saudi Arabian Embassy in Washington, in this June 18, 2004 file photo.  REUTERS/Shaun Heasley/Files

Then Saudi Arabian Foreign Policy Advisor Adel-Al-Jubeir gestures during a news conference in response to U.S. engineer Paul Marshal Johnson's beheading at the Saudi Arabian Embassy in Washington, in this June 18, 2004 file photo.

Credit: Reuters/Shaun Heasley/Files

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TEHRAN (Reuters) - Iran rejected U.S. allegations that two Iranians planned to assassinate the Saudi envoy to Washington, calling it a "untrue and baseless," the country's English language Press TV reported on Tuesday.

"Iran strongly denies the untrue and baseless allegations over a plan to assassinate the Saudi ambassador to Washington," Press TV quoted Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast as saying.

"It is a comedy show fabricated by America."

Mehmanparast also said the relationship between Iran and Saudi Arabia could not be harmed by "fabricating such baseless claims."

"Our relationship with Riyadh is based on mutual respect and such baseless claims will not succeed."

U.S. authorities broke up an alleged plot to bomb the Israeli and Saudi Arabian embassies in Washington and assassinate the Saudi ambassador to the United States, court documents and a U.S. official said on Tuesday.

The alleged plotters were identified as Manssor Arbabsiar and Gholam Shakuri -- both originally from Iran -- in the criminal complaint unsealed in federal court in New York City.

Political tension between Iran and Saudi Arabia has been increasing since Saudi forces intervened in March to help Bahrain's Sunni rulers crush pro-reform demonstrations backed by the Shi'ite majority.

Iran and the United State are at odds over the country's disputed nuclear program, which Washington and its allies say is a cover to build bombs.

Tehran denies this, saying it needs nuclear technology to generate electricity to meet its booming domestic need.

The United States and Israel, which Iran refuses to recognize, have not ruled out military action if diplomacy fails to resolve the row with Iran.

(Reporting by Zahra Hosseinian, Writing by Parisa Hafezi)

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Comments (4)
Neversoft wrote:
..And the drumbeat for MORE war continues.
War on two fronts isn’t enough lets pick a few more useless battles so we can spill our blood spend our treasure to give control of a country to the people that HATE us and take nothing away from it but another bloody nose.
What other reason could the government have for allowing this to be released to the press? NO other reason but more groundwork for more war.
We are NOT unbeatable especially when we are so overextended as we currently are.
Must we continue down this path and run ourselves down when our real adversary (China) is building up economically (and will surpass us in 5 years)and already has a standing infantry that outnumbers ours 4 – 1??
Want empire? Fine.
Then do it right!

Oct 11, 2011 5:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Brunaux wrote:
Nice try from the US and Clinton.
We are sick of your lies.
Don’t you feel ashamed of yourself causing unrest and instability everywhere in the world. Shame on you.

Oct 11, 2011 6:27pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
LukeEric wrote:
And the Koch brothers have been dealing illegally with Iran for years! Yay for the Koch brothers! True Americans!

Oct 11, 2011 6:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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