Jackson doctor to star in tell-all documentary

LOS ANGELES Tue Nov 8, 2011 2:43pm EST

Dr. Conrad Murray in an undated publicity photo for his tell-all documentary. REUTERS/MSNBC/Handout

Dr. Conrad Murray in an undated publicity photo for his tell-all documentary.

Credit: Reuters/MSNBC/Handout

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LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the death of Michael Jackson will star in a tell-all TV documentary airing this week, the company behind the film said on Tuesday.

The 50-minute documentary about Dr. Conrad Murray will air in the United States on MSNBC on Friday under the title "Michael Jackson and the Doctor," the network said.

The broadcast will come just days after Murray, 58, was found guilty on Monday of gross negligence in his care of the Jackson, leading to his death in June 2009. Murray pleaded not guilty but did not testify at his trial and is now in jail in Los Angeles ahead of a November 29 sentencing hearing.

The documentary explores the relationship between Jackson and his personal physician. It was shot before Murray's conviction and in it the doctor reveals details of his time with Jackson.

"Walking around with painful feet as a dancer, unbelievable calluses, so I brought the appropriate specialists. He was very pleased of course," Murray says in an excerpt posted on celebrity website TMZ.com.

The documentary was produced by October Films and what's it all about? productions and is distributed by British company Zodiak Rights.

They secured exclusive access to Murray in November 2009 -- following Jackson's death on June 25 of that year -- and filmmakers shot footage of the doctor over two years and during his six-week trial, Zodiak said.

The film will air on Thursday in Australia, and later this week in Britain, Zodiak said.

Medical examiners found Jackson died of an overdose of the powerful anesthetic propofol and sedatives, which Murray said he gave the singer as a sleep aid.

(Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis: Editing by Jill Serjeant)

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