Castro daughter, dissident blogger clash on Twitter

HAVANA Tue Nov 8, 2011 8:56pm EST

Mariela Castro, the daughter of Cuba's president Raul Castro and the niece of former president Fidel Castro is talks to media in Copenhagen July 29, 2009 about her work for better rights for the Cuban lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities. Some 5500 participants from 98 countries are in Copenhagen for the World Outgames 2009, eight days of sport and culture to promote rights for homosexuals worldwide.  REUTERS/Casper Christoffersen/Scanpix

Mariela Castro, the daughter of Cuba's president Raul Castro and the niece of former president Fidel Castro is talks to media in Copenhagen July 29, 2009 about her work for better rights for the Cuban lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities. Some 5500 participants from 98 countries are in Copenhagen for the World Outgames 2009, eight days of sport and culture to promote rights for homosexuals worldwide.

Credit: Reuters/Casper Christoffersen/Scanpix

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HAVANA (Reuters) - Social media moved into a new realm in technologically backward Cuba Tuesday when Cuban President Raul Castro's controversial daughter Mariela began tweeting and quickly got into the Twitter equivalent of a shouting match with dissident blogger Yoani Sanchez.

Mariela Castro called Sanchez and her compatriots "despicable parasites" in a brief exchange that may have been the first direct confrontation, verbal or otherwise, between dissidents and a member of the Castro family after years of mutual animosity.

Sanchez, who regularly criticizes the lack of freedoms in communist Cuba in her internationally known "Generation Y" blog, touched off the dispute by sending tweets that welcomed Mariela Castro to the "plurality of Twitter" where "no one can shut me up, deny me permission to travel or block entrance."

"When will we Cubans be able to come out of other closets?" she asked, alluding to Mariela Castro's championing of gay rights as head of Cuba's National Center for Sex Education.

"Tolerance is total or is it not?" Sanchez tweeted.

Castro, 49, replied coolly with an obtuse putdown, saying, "Your focus of tolerance reproduces the old mechanisms of power. To improve your 'services' you need to study."

But later, after apparently receiving a number of tweets from other dissidents, Castro lashed out.

"Despicable parasites: did you receive the order from your employers to respond to me in unison and with the same predetermined script? Be creative," she wrote, reflecting the contempt Cuban leaders have for dissidents and the belief that they work for their longtime enemy the United States.

They can barely hide their rancor toward Sanchez in particular, but do not mention her or other dissidents by name. Despite having an international following, Sanchez is little known in Cuba where Internet access is limited.

Just as she is at the vanguard in Cuba in supporting gay rights, Mariela Castro appears to be the first in the Castro family to publicly and directly engage in tweeting.

Her father, who is 80, and her uncle, former leader Fidel Castro, 85, have Twitter accounts, but they are used only to post stories and columns from Cuba's state-run media.

After her exchange with Sanchez, she posted a link to an interview about her recent trip to Holland, where she toured Amsterdam's famous red-light district.

She raised eyebrows by saying there that she knew of Cubans who would prostitute themselves with laborers just so they could take a bath.

In a tweet, Mariela Castro said there had been "manipulations, like always" of her comments.

(Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

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Comments (2)
brian-decree wrote:
“Castro, 49, replied coolly with an obtuse putdown, saying, “Your focus of tolerance reproduces the old mechanisms of power. To improve your ‘services’ you need to study.” ”

“obtuse putdown” is the authors opinion alone.

It is clearly not an obtuse putdown, but an informative answer that most would fully understand.

Anyone who attacks these countries and their leaders simply doesn’t reference the historical record for the region.

By FAR the most destructive influence in south and central america in the last 100 years is the west and the grossly corrupt US government.

Millions have been slaughtered because of US imperialism in the region… This is the historical record.

This journalist would rather give us their personal opinion.

Nov 09, 2011 4:22am EST  --  Report as abuse
Armando83 wrote:
“By FAR the most destructive influence in south and central america in the last 100 years is the west and the grossly corrupt US government.”

Aaaaaaaaaand that justifies the current political repression in Cuba because….?

“Millions have been slaughtered because of US imperialism in the region… This is the historical record.”

And millions have been slaughtered by the communists in the name of establishing workers’ paradises. Where’s your condemnation for that?

Nov 09, 2011 9:19am EST  --  Report as abuse
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