UPDATE 2-Irish banks suffer deposit outflow in Oct

Wed Nov 30, 2011 10:16am EST

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DUBLIN Nov 30 (Reuters) - Banks based in Ireland suffered a near 3 billion euros outflow in deposits in October, reversing two months of inflows, as the deepening euro zone debt crisis spooked some savers, central bank data showed on Wednesday.

Irish banks, including local units of foreign banks, had nearly 350 billion euros in deposits from residents and non-residents at the end of October compared to 352 billion euros at the end of September.

Data for just the Irish-owned lenders -- Bank of Ireland , AIB and permanent tsb -- showed that deposits had risen by 1 billion euros to 266 billion euros in October.

The annual rate of deposit decline in Ireland ticked up to 11 percent in October from 10.5 percent the month before as insurers and pension funds upped their withdrawals.

Irish consumers, companies and pension funds have been withdrawing cash from Irish-based banks for the past year but the rate of decline in household deposits eased to 4.5 percent year-on-year in October after falling 4.7 percent in the previous month.

The rate of decline in deposits among pension funds, insurers and non-bank financial insitutions increased to 25 percent year-on-year in October from 22.9 percent in September.

Ireland's government is hoping the latest recapitalisation of its banks, which was completed in July, will restore investor and customer confidence, reverse deposit outflows and reduce the sector's reliance on loans from the European Central Bank (ECB).

Overall, banks based in Ireland had 100.9 billion euros of outstanding loans with the ECB at the end of October, of which 71.5 billion was held by banks servicing the local economy such as Bank of Ireland, Allied Irish Banks and Ulster Bank, up from 71.1 billion a month ago.

After years of reckless lending, Irish banks have sharply cut the supply of credit to consumers as they seek to maintain their capital bases. The annual rate of decline in loans to households eased slightly to 3.9 in October compared to 4.0 percent a month earlier.

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