Strong earthquake jolts Japan, no tsunami warning

SINGAPORE Sun Jan 1, 2012 6:46am EST

Typhoon Washi survivors rest in a makeshift shelter on New Year's day, near a car swept by rampaging floodwaters, in the southern Philippines city of Iligan on Mindanao island January 1, 2012. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Typhoon Washi survivors rest in a makeshift shelter on New Year's day, near a car swept by rampaging floodwaters, in the southern Philippines city of Iligan on Mindanao island January 1, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Erik De Castro

SINGAPORE (Reuters) - A strong earthquake with a magnitude of 7.0 jolted eastern and northeastern Japan on Sunday, but there were no immediate reports of injuries or damages and no tsunami warning was issued.

The earthquake measured 4 in central Tokyo, Fukushima and their surrounding areas on the Japanese intensity scale, which measures ground motion, according to Japan Meteorological Agency, which uses a different measuring system than the U.S. Geological Survey.

A spokesman for Tokyo Electric Power said there were no reports of any abnormalities at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plan following the quake.

Some high-speed train services in northern Japan were suspended after the earthquake, but soon resumed operations, Kyodo news reported.

The 7.0 magnitude earthquake, at a depth of nearly 217 miles, was recorded off Japan's southeastern Izu islands on Sunday at 0527 GMT, the U.S. Geological Survey reported.

The Hawaii-based U.S. Pacific Tsunami Warning Center has not issued a tsunami warning following the earthquake located south-southwest of Hachijo-jima in the Izu islands.

Earthquakes are common in Japan, one of the world's most seismically active areas. The country accounts for about 20 percent of the world's earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater.

On March 11, 2011, the northeast coast was struck by a magnitude 9 earthquake, the strongest quake in Japan on record, and a massive tsunami, which triggered the world's worst nuclear crisis in 25 years since Chernobyl.

The disaster left up to 23,000 dead or missing.

(Singapore world desk, additional reporting by Taiga Uranaka and Kiyoshi Takenaka)

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Comments (4)
This is probably just a pre-cursor to the larger quake that is coming. If one notes the position of the March ’11 quake and compares it with this one you can see where there is SW moving stress on the plate. Japan should prepare for a very big quake quite soon with the amount of pressure that has been building in their tectonic region.

Jan 01, 2012 1:34am EST  --  Report as abuse
Suchindranath wrote:
Tokyo rocks! It used to 2-3 times a week when I was there for two and a half years. Quite normal. The Fukushima incident was freak complicated by a tsunami and the nuclear plants.

Jan 01, 2012 1:45am EST  --  Report as abuse
I agree with Twitchy. Suchindranath, yeah it rocks…earthquakes tend to make everything rock and I don’t find that remark amusing. When my husband was in Kyoto during the Korean War, they had a quake and it wasn’t amusing. If you lived there, your idea of ‘normalcy’ would change.

Jan 01, 2012 6:49am EST  --  Report as abuse
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