Mark Wahlberg apologizes for 9/11 comments

LOS ANGELES Wed Jan 18, 2012 7:03pm EST

Actor Mark Wahlberg attends the nominees luncheon for the 83rd annual Academy Awards in Beverly Hills, California February 7, 2011. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Actor Mark Wahlberg attends the nominees luncheon for the 83rd annual Academy Awards in Beverly Hills, California February 7, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Mario Anzuoni

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LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Actor Mark Wahlberg apologized on Wednesday for saying events may have turned out differently had he been on one of the planes that crashed on 9/11, after incurring the wrath of critics and one victim's widow.

"If I was on that plane with my kids, it wouldn't have went down like it did. There would have been a lot of blood in that first-class cabin and then me saying, 'OK, we're going to land somewhere safely, don't worry,'" the actor said in an interview with Men's Journal magazine that was released one day earlier.

"The Fighter" star, 44, was scheduled to be on one of the planes that crashed into the World Trade Center on September 11, 2011 and made the comments in that context, but after media outlets reported that a widow of one 9/11 victim called his comments "disrespectful," the actor issued a formal apology.

"To speculate about such a situation is ridiculous to begin with, and to suggest I would have done anything differently than the passengers on that plane was irresponsible. I deeply apologize to the families of the victims that my answer came off as insensitive, it was certainly not my intention," Wahlberg said in a statement.

The Oscar-nominated actor, who started his career in music as rapper Marky Mark, transitioned into film and is currently promoting "Contraband," a high-octane action movie in which he plays a former smuggler forced to protect his brother-in-law.

(Reporting By Piya Sinha-Roy, Editing by Bob Tourtellotte)

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Comments (23)
That takes a man of good moral character to apologize and admit he was mistaken in something he said.

Jan 18, 2012 7:09pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Cynicaldude wrote:
Good man, apologizing quick and humbly.

Jan 18, 2012 8:17pm EST  --  Report as abuse
zemo wrote:
who knows? Maybe he’s right. But then, if he had been on that plane, maybe there would have also been some Triad gangs on board, and Russian Mafia, and Colombian Cartel… which means he would’ve at least needed the help of Bruce Willis and perhaps an unlikely assist from Tracy Morgan, you know, for the much needed and trusted, though predictable, comic relief, you know, the expendable black character that whatever the dire urgency of any harrowing situation manages to turn serious into humorous with a quirky quip and outrageous response to the bad guys’ demands. But it’s not like he’s starting to blur reality with the fantasy of his roles in movies, noooooooo, he just figures in any situation real life throws his way, you know, he’s the star, right? He’ll always come through in the end.

Jan 18, 2012 8:28pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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