NFL commissioner confident of HGH testing by off-season

Fri Feb 3, 2012 3:28pm EST

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INDIANAPOLIS - National Football League (NFL) commissioner Roger Goodell is optimistic an agreement will be reached with the NFL Players Association (NFLPA) to begin testing players for use of human growth hormone this off-season, he said on Friday.

The NFL announced following the labor agreement with the NFLPA that players would be tested for the performance enhancing drug this season, but the union has resisted, questioning the fairness and accuracy of the test.

Goodell said he thought there would be HGH testing during the off-season and regular season.

"We certainly hope so," he told reporters at his annual State of the League news conference during Super Bowl week. "We're prepared to do it, we agreed to do it last August. We have been working to try to address the issues.

"We believe the science is clear. We do not hear any dispute from scientists around the world. The fact (is) that this test is valid and that we have the basis to enable an HGH test that is fair to the players."

The commissioner said talks with the players union have continued in hopes of instituting a workable plan.

"We expect to be able to do that," Goodell said. "We had discussions as recently as two weeks ago that we made some progress on and I'm hopeful that we will be able to get this implemented."

The NFLPA's resistance, according to the World Anti-Doping Agency, is centered around concerns that football players could possess different threshold levels of HGH than other athletes.

The test, already recognized as reliable by some of the world's biggest sporting entities, including the International Olympic Committee, does not detect the amount of HGH in an athlete's system but rather the ratio of different types of human growth hormone isoforms.

The size and shape of the athlete is irrelevant because it is a change in the ratio that indicates the presence of a synthetic hormone.

(Reporting by Larry Fine, Editing by Gene Cherry)

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Comments (3)
Don_W wrote:
In the SuperBowl of ’08 the Giants were stronger then at any time during the season. The Pats were worn down. There is no question that since Rodney Harrison and others were suspended for PED use the management (Kraft and Belichek) forbade the use of PEDS and had a club anti-doping policy using private testing. It was clear that the Giants had an unfair advantage.

This year. both the Giants and the Patriots have nearly a full team healthy for the game. It has always been known that the proper use of PEDs such as HGH helps heal injuries and keep an athlete in shape over the long haul. I wouldn’t doubt that the smirk on coach Belicheks face is his knowledge that his team is experiencing the same health as the Giants. Microdosing has come a long way in the past several years, and since the league often gives a player up to 18 hours notice before a test there is planty of time to flush the evidence.

Feb 03, 2012 5:34pm EST  --  Report as abuse
pc800cc wrote:
duh…..hgh………do ya really think so…..? or are 22 inch arms and 34 inch necks just ‘normal’….

Feb 04, 2012 3:39am EST  --  Report as abuse
model94 wrote:
“The NFLPA’s resistance, according to the World Anti-Doping Agency, is centered around concerns that football players could possess different threshold levels of HGH than other athletes.” Please let me translate that: The NFLPA’s resistance is centered around concerns that football players are using HGH.”

Feb 04, 2012 9:04am EST  --  Report as abuse
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