Apple's Chinese legal woes over iPad surface at home

Thu Feb 23, 2012 8:05pm EST

Feb 23 (Reuters) - The Asian firm trying to stop Apple Inc from using the iPad name has now launched an attack on the consumer electronics giant's home turf, filing a lawsuit in California that accuses the iPhone-maker of employing deception when it bought the "iPad" trademark.

Proview International Holdings Ltd, a major computer monitor maker that fell on hard times during the economic crisis, is already suing the U.S. company in multiple Chinese jurisdictions and requesting that sales of iPads be suspended across the country.

Last week, it filed a lawsuit in Santa Clara County that brings their legal dispute to Silicon Valley as well. Proview accuses Apple of creating a "special purpose" entity - IP Application Development Ltd, or IPAD - to buy the iPad name from it, concealing Apple's role in the matter.

In its filing, Proview outlined how lawyers for IPAD repeatedly said it would not be competing with the Chinese firm, and refused to say why they needed the trademark.

Those representations were made "with the intent to defraud and induce the plaintiffs to enter into the agreement," Proview said in the filing dated Feb. 17, requesting an unspecified amount of damages.

Apple, which has said Proview is refusing to honor a years-old agreement, did not respond to requests for comment on Thursday.

The battle between a little-known Asian company and the world's most valuable technology corporation dates back to a disagreement over precisely what was covered in a deal for the transfer of the iPad trademark to Apple in 2009.

Authorities in several Chinese cities have already seized iPads, citing the legal dispute.

Proview, which maintains it holds the iPad trademark in China, has been suing Apple in various jurisdictions in the country for trademark infringement, while also using the courts to get retailers in some smaller cities to stop selling the tablet PCs.

China is becoming an increasingly pivotal market for Apple, which sold more than 15 million iPads worldwide in the last quarter alone and is trying to expand its business in the world's No. 2 economy to sustain its rip-roaring pace of growth.

The country is also where the majority of its iPhones and iPads are now assembled, in partnership with Foxconn.

A Shanghai court this week threw out Proview's request to halt iPad sales in the city, averting an embarrassing suspension at its own flagship stores. But the outcome of the broader dispute hinges on a hearing of the higher court in Guangdong, which earlier ruled in Proview's favor.

The next hearing in that case is set for Feb. 29.

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Comments (1)
beancube2101 wrote:
Stake holder insiders in Apple knows they can have much higher selling prices in China’s gray markets. Exotic cars are selling that way long time ago in China and Russia.

Feb 23, 2012 8:36pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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