Defiant North Korea says rocket launch to go ahead

SEOUL Sun Mar 18, 2012 3:11am EDT

1 of 2. Models of a North Korean Scud-B missile (R) and South Korean missiles are displayed at the Korean War Memorial Museum in Seoul March 16, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Lee Jae-Won

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SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea on Sunday rejected criticism of its planned long-range missile launch which threatens to upset its only major benefactor, China, and put relations with the United States back in the freezer just as they seemed to be starting to thaw.

Political analysts say the launch, which would violate U.N. resolutions on the heavily sanctioned state, is aimed at boosting the legitimacy of its young new ruler Kim Jong-un who inherited power after his father's death in December.

"The peaceful development and use of space is a universally recognized legitimate right of a sovereign state," the North's state KCNA news agency said.

North Korea says it is using the rocket to launch a satellite to mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of Kim Il-sung, the country's founding ruler and grandfather of the current ruler.

The United States, and others, say it is much the same as a ballistic missile test and therefore off-limits for the isolated state which has for years been trying to build a nuclear arsenal.

Washington, which last month agreed to supply North Korea with food in exchange for a suspension of nuclear tests, missile launches and uranium enrichment and to allow nuclear inspectors into the country, called the planned launch "highly provocative".

More troubling perhaps for Pyongyang, which is long accustomed to trading invective with Washington, Beijing called the planned launch a "worry" in a rare attempt to put public pressure on its impoverished ally.

The North has invited foreign observers and journalists to attend the launch.

It announced the planned launch on Friday just weeks after the deal with Washington. It will coincide with the 100th anniversary of the birth of its founder Kim Il-sung.

In April 2009, North Korea conducted a ballistic rocket launch that resulted in a new round of U.N. sanctions, squeezing the secretive state's already troubled economy and deepening its isolation.

That launch was dismissed as a failure after the first stage fell into the Sea of Japan without placing a satellite in orbit. Another test failed in similar circumstances in 1998.

The new launch is due to take place between April 12-16, to coincide with Kim Il-sung's centenary celebrations and will coincide with parliamentary elections in South Korea.

Japan has said it would consider deploying PAC3 missile interceptors as it did in a 2009 launch by North Korea.

(Reporting by Sung-won Shim; Editing by David Chance and Jonathan Thatcher)

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Comments (15)
malechaike wrote:
DPRK is dangerous.

Mar 18, 2012 3:43am EDT  --  Report as abuse
iceman-2004 wrote:
“The peaceful development and use of space is a universally recognized legitimate right of a sovereign state,” as stated by the North’s state KCNA news agency sound familiar to another states claim on their peaceful development of nuclear energy. Hey, if that line works for Iran, why not North Korea?

Mar 18, 2012 6:21am EDT  --  Report as abuse
sumbunny wrote:
Just last week we had comments lauding the US plan to send food aid. Don’t want to say “told you so”, but . . . naivete’ does seem to be a constant in the universe.

Mar 18, 2012 8:41am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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