Pink-haired student invited back to school

Wed Mar 21, 2012 1:08pm EDT

Delaware middle school student Brianna Moore stands in front of the mirror with pink hair at her residence in Newark, Delaware March 20, 2012. Moore was sent home from school for having pink hair that her father helped her dye after she improved her grades. REUTERS/Tim Shaffer

Delaware middle school student Brianna Moore stands in front of the mirror with pink hair at her residence in Newark, Delaware March 20, 2012. Moore was sent home from school for having pink hair that her father helped her dye after she improved her grades.

Credit: Reuters/Tim Shaffer

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(Reuters) - A school that barred a sixth grader after she dyed her hair pink with her parents' blessing to celebrate her good grades lifted its ban on Tuesday following an outcry from civil rights advocates.

After missing three days of classes, pink-haired Brianna Moore headed back to Shue-Medill Middle School in Newark, Delaware, on Tuesday after administrators reversed their decision after a call from the Delaware branch of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

"We're on our way right now," said Kevin Moore as he drove his 12-year-old daughter to school.

At his daughter's request last week, he helped dye her hair a shade called crimson storm, which has a pink hue, as a reward for improving her grades.

But when she showed up for school the next day, she was sent home and told not to return until her hair met school policy mandating a "natural color, brown, blond, black, natural red/auburn."

The ACLU soon got in touch with attorneys for the school district and asked, "Don't you think this is unconstitutional?" said Kathleen MacRae, ACLU executive director in Delaware.

Moore was invited back to school with assurances she would not be punished, said Wendy Lapham, school district spokeswoman.

"The hair is not going to be an issue," Lapham said.

(Editing By Barbara Goldberg and Paul Thomasch)

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Comments (9)
Spiffy wrote:
That’s right, people are allowed to look however they want on government property. Public schools must follow the same rules as the public library.

Mar 21, 2012 2:36pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Kevin5069 wrote:
Nice to hear common sense prevail for once.

Too bad it took the ACLU and a room full of lawyers for that to happen though. I hope someone is reviewing this decision with those who made it before any other foolishness has to hit national media.

Mar 21, 2012 6:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
AlisonR1 wrote:
“The hair is not going to be an issue,” Lapham said.

Her hair shouldn’t have been an issue in the first place. It’s just hair, who cares what color it is.

Mar 21, 2012 10:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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