"Lorax" statue stolen from California home of Dr. Seuss

LOS ANGELES Tue Mar 27, 2012 8:01pm EDT

A 300-pound bronze statue of the Lorax, a character from a Dr. Seuss book and movie of the same name, is seen in this San Diego Police handout photo received by Reuters March 27, 2012. REUTERS/San Diego Police Department/Handout

A 300-pound bronze statue of the Lorax, a character from a Dr. Seuss book and movie of the same name, is seen in this San Diego Police handout photo received by Reuters March 27, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/San Diego Police Department/Handout

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LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A 300-pound (136-kg) bronze statue of the Lorax, a character from the Dr. Seuss book and hit movie of the same name, has been stolen from the late author's San Diego estate, police said on Tuesday.

The 3-foot-high (1-meter) statue of the Lorax standing on a tree stump with his arms outstretched was reported missing from the hillside property on Monday morning, San Diego Police Lieutenant Andra Brown said.

Theodor Geisel, who wrote The Lorax and other best-selling children's books under the pen-name Dr. Seuss, died in 1991 at the age of 87.

His widow, Audrey, still lives on the estate in the San Diego community of La Jolla.

Brown said police were trying to determine if the theft was related to an animated film based on the book, voiced by Zac Efron and Taylor Swift, that is currently playing in theaters.

"We don't know if it's just a prank because of the recent release of the movie or if someone thinks it's going to be worth a buck or two because it's a lot of (metal)," Brown said.

"We're just hoping that the suspects return it," she said. "The Geisel family is just asking that it be returned and they don't want to pursue the matter any further. Which is not to say the police won't."

Brown said evidence at the scene suggests that the thieves rolled the statue down the hill to an adjacent property, where it was likely loaded onto a waiting vehicle.

She said the statue was one of two made by Geisel's stepdaughter. The other was given to a museum.

(Reporting by Dan Whitcomb; Editing by Tim Gaynor and Eric Beech)

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Comments (2)
fugedaboutit wrote:
Lazy journalism at best and more likely irresponsible and unimaginative reporting by Reuters. Perhaps, just perhaps, someone was making a statement that Dr. Seuss’ original call for taking care of the planet is as worthy of preservation as the planet itself.

Perhaps those who sell what is not theirs need to be forced to give it back or have it taken from them.

“You poor stupid guy! You never can tell what some people will buy.”…..

UNLESS

http://thenext100yrs.com/save-the-lorax-shun-the-stuff/

http://www.fastcoexist.com/1679430/mazda-takes-its-controversial-lorax-campaign-to-public-schools

Mar 28, 2012 8:48pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
fugedaboutit wrote:
Lazy journalism at best and more likely irresponsible and unimaginative reporting by Reuters. Perhaps, just perhaps, someone was making a statement that Dr. Seuss’ original call for taking care of the planet is as worthy of preservation as the planet itself.

Perhaps those who sell what is not theirs need to be forced to give it back or have it taken from them.

“You poor stupid guy! You never can tell what some people will buy.”…..

UNLESS

http://thenext100yrs.com/save-the-lorax-shun-the-stuff/

http://www.fastcoexist.

Mar 28, 2012 8:48pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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