Iran suspends accreditation for Reuters in Tehran

LONDON Thu Mar 29, 2012 2:19pm EDT

A young boy stands behind a flag as he and his mother, supporters of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, wait for his arrival at Tehran's Mehrabad International Airport May 5, 2010, after his trip to attend the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference at United Nations Headquarters in New York. REUTERS/Morteza Nikoubazl

A young boy stands behind a flag as he and his mother, supporters of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, wait for his arrival at Tehran's Mehrabad International Airport May 5, 2010, after his trip to attend the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference at United Nations Headquarters in New York.

Credit: Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl

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LONDON (Reuters) - The Iranian government has suspended the press accreditation for Reuters staff in Tehran after the publication of a video story on women's martial arts training which contained an error.

Reuters, the news arm of Thomson Reuters, the global news and information group, corrected the story after the martial arts club where the video was filmed made a complaint.

The story's headline, "Thousands of female Ninjas train as Iran's assassins", was corrected to read "Three thousand women Ninjas train in Iran".

Iran's Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance subsequently contacted the Reuters Tehran bureau chief about the video and its publication, as a result of which Reuters' 11 personnel were told to hand back their press cards.

"We acknowledge this error occurred and regard it as a very serious matter. It was promptly corrected the same day it came to our attention," said editor-in-chief Stephen J. Adler.

"In addition, we have conducted an internal review and have taken appropriate steps to prevent a recurrence," he said.

Adler said that Reuters was in discussions with Iranian authorities in an effort to restore the accreditation.

"Reuters always strives for the highest standards in journalism and our policy is to acknowledge errors honestly and correct them promptly when they occur," he added.

(Writing by Peter Millership)

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Comments (6)
MetalHead8 wrote:
Iran is seriously made at rueters for that? what a joke

Mar 29, 2012 3:25pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Darkdart wrote:
Dear Reuter’s Press Staff, Thousands to “3″ Thousand is nit-picky. But what about the “assassin’s” portion? Were they or weren’t they??? Stay honest, persevere and continue to report world news as you do. You’re without a doubt one of the best groups in the business and I wouldn’t start my day any other way. Kudos!

Mar 29, 2012 4:12pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
TruthMonitor wrote:
In article after article, Reuters’ bias against Iran and its allies is plain for everyone to see. This is only a slap on the wrist.

Mar 29, 2012 5:04pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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